What is a infarct left frontal lobe?

Type of stroke. Strokes are due to either blood clot blocking a blood vessel, called an ischemic infarct, or due to bleeding, called a hemorrhagic stroke. An infarct in the left frontal lobe is due to a blood clot that has occluded or blocked one of the main vessel supplying blood to the left frontal part or lobe of the brain with symptoms involves language disturbance and right sided weakness in face/arm//leg.

Related Questions

What medication can be used to build the brain tissue, report says there is evidence of poorly defined area of altered signal intensity seen involving left frontal lobe displayed hyperintense signal on T2W and flair images suggestive of infarct.?

None. Presumably you didn't just wander into an MRI facility & make an impulse purchase. A doctor ordered the MRI for a reason. An MRI is meaningless by itself. You're the patient, not the MRI. You don't even really know what's going on yet. Your doctor is ethically obligated to interpret the MRI results as they apply to you. Brain tissue can't be "built." Once gone, it's gone forever. Read more...

I am 62 years male. I have acute infarct in left frontal lobe. I am on clobazam + asprin + atorvastatin+levicitam. For how long do I need to take it.

Brain infarct. You need to follow your doctors instuctions very carefully, and take medication and treatment as it is prescribed. Get regular follow up appointments. Read more...

What would a person be like if they damaged the left frontal lobe?

Speech and weakness. Damage to the left frontal lobe can occur from various causes, but often blood clot occluding blood flow or a hemorrhagic stroke with often several symptoms that are unfortunately seen. These include slurred speech, difficulty with expression of speech, however, fortunately still often able to understand speech, and drooping of the right face as well as weakness of the right arm and leg. Read more...

What does a left frontal lobe soft spot mean and what are the dangers?

????? Do you mean outside the skull or inside the skull? Is this something you can feel on the side of your head? Because you said "frontal lobe," but the frontal lobe is on the other side of some tough bone. If you mean actually in the brain, you'll have to explain "soft spot," because the living brain has roughly the consistency of raw egg yolk. It's ALL soft. Please repost with clearer wording. Read more...

I had a 3cm adeno in left frontal lobe=craniotomy 1mo ago. No other disease known. I sleep a lot. How long is recovery? 69 and otherwise healthy.

Sleep Craniotomy. Most people will return to normal sleep levels in 6-8 weeks after a craniotomy. You may also have had an anticonvulsant prescribed to prevent seizures. This class of medication will sedate or increase sleep requirements. Most people will adjust to medication in 6-8 weeks also. Try to increase aerobic exercise to improve sleep patterns as well as improve stamina. Read more...
Depends on resection. It sounds like you had the resection of a 3cm adeno (carcinoma). If this is the case, the extent of resection, the degree of surrounding edema (swelling) will play a role in recovery. Sleeping a lot is not uncommon and can be related to medications as well as the post-operative changes in the brain. Read more...

What do I do if possible damage to left frontal lobe?

Depends... Difficult to answer without more information, but if there is damage to the frontal lobe, this usually cannot be repaired, and therapy is performed to maximize function. Please rephrase if you need additional information. Read more...

I have a question what could happen years later after getting a corner of your left frontal lobe remove?

Left frontal lobe. Is in most people involved in motor function, memory, language, impulse, judgement, sexual and social functions. The extent of changes in any of this functions will vary depending on the ability of your neurons to reconnect and regenerate and intercommunications. Your neurosurgeon will be the best to discuss the effect based on how much is removed and the loci. Read more...