New flashes of light in both eyes, can this be retinal detachment or tear?

Flashes and floaters. The classic visual symptoms of retinal detachment are light flashes, floaters, and loss of vision. Someone who experiences these symptoms should see an ophthalmologist immediately for evaluation.
Both. Persistent flashes of light, floaters can be a simple posterior vitreous detachment to something as serious and sight-threatening as a retinal tear or detachment. You should see your eye doctor as soon as possible for a thorough eye exam.
Flashes. It sounds as if you have had a posterior vitreous detachment. This is a situation where the vitreous(jelly) of the eye detaches (not a retinal detachment), it then "crumples" up leaving dots, spots, strands of blurry vitreous; i.e. The "floater". The tugging from the vitreous causes the flashes. You are at risk of a retinal detachment and should be examined.

Related Questions

Can I prevent retinal detachment with a healthy diet and multivitamins and omega 3 and exercise? I had tears in both eyes treated by laser 3months ago

Unfortunately no. Healthy diet and vitamins can help the function of the retina, but holes are caused by anatomical weaknesses of the retina. You can have an abnormal anatomy with perfect function and vise versa. Vitamins help the retina stay healthy and function well but it will not change anatomical weaknesses. You must regularly keep an eye on your retina with consistent exams. Good question! Read more...
No. . Retinal detachments, due to retinal tears are called rhegmatogenous retinal detachments (rrd). Rrd is not preventable through diet, vitamin supplements or exercise. The only way to prevent an rrd is to have routine, detailed, thorough and complete dilated retinal examinations by a retina specialist to look for retinal tears/holes/breaks. If found, immediate laser treatment will prevent most rrds. Read more...
RD not prevented vit. VItamins have not been proven to help or hurt your chances of developing more retinal pathology. They have only been shown to help prevent progression of age related macular degeneration. Read more...

I am a -5.75 in both eyes. I don't know what is considered severe but just out of curiousness. Should I be worried about retinal detachment later in life?

Not severe. This is higher than most, but not severe but does not protect you from never having retinal problems. I recommend a full dilated eye exam once a year to be safe and earlier if you note any new significant changes in vision. Read more...
Higher Risk. Being that near-sighted does pose a higher risk of retinal detachment than someone without near-sightedness. Nonetheless, the risk is still very low. The best way to address this concern is to get an annual dilated eye exam by an ophthalmologist to check for any signs that could predispose to a retinal detachment, such as lattice degeneration. Read more...

Which type of accidents can cause retinal detachment in both eyes?

Serious ones. A substantial trauma to the head and orbital regions as well as bilateral simultaneous compression of the globe. This might happen in a car accident in which an airbag deploys. Read more...
Traumatic Injuries. Severe blunt or penetrating injuries can cause bilateral retinal detachments. Accidents that involve sudden deceleration such as an mva or bunge jumping can also cause the retina to detach. Read more...

I had retinal detachment in both eyes. Will I also develop cataracts?

It depends. While everyone gets some degree of changes in the lens that are also known as cataracts, there is not really an association between retinal detachments and the progression of cataracts. However, an intraocular surgery called a vitrectomy is often used to repair a retina detachment. Vitrectomy surgery can cause a cataract to progress faster than it normally would. Read more...
Not necessarily. If the retinal detachment was repaired with a para plana vitrectomy, then there is a greater chance of developing a cataract. If however it was only lasered or a buckle was used, then the risk of cataract formation is not necessarily higher. Read more...
Likely! How the surgical correction of the retinal detachment was done is very important in answering this question. If a vitrectomy was done, you most likely will get cataracts sooner than later, otherwise risks are minor. Most nearsighted people tend to get cataracts earlier. Read more...

Why do you need a patch for both eyes after retinal detachment surgery?

Usually not: After retinal detachment surgery, some technique is done to close the tear or opening in the retina. If gas is used, one needs to be quiet so that the laser or freezing technique used to cause an adhesion around the tear so it seals, one needs to be quiet and still enough to allow it to heal. Some patch both eyes to keep the person quiet for a few days. Read more...
Patch after surgery. The patch is used as a precaution to protect your eyes from accidental rubbing. A few sutures are placed at the end of the surgery and your doctor does not want them to come undone at this time. The patch also helps to minimize infection... Read more...
Just on one eye. The eye patch is protective for the operative eye only. It is not common nowadays to have both eyes patched if only one eye is operated on. Read more...
Limits eye movement. Your doctor may have patched both eyes so that you don't move your eyes. Depending on the situation, your doctor may have bilaterally patched you because both eyes move when you try to only move one eye. This type of patching is very uncommon nowadays. Read more...

Floaters in both eyes gradually over past decade, could it be retinal detachment?

Not likely. Retinal detachment usually occurs rapidly (hours to days) and would cause significant vision loss. Although floaters can be a harbinger sign of retinal detachment, as long as there has not been any vision changes it is unlikely that these floaters are related. You should have a dilated eye examination to be sure. See an eye doctor soon. Read more...
See EyeMD. Common symptoms associated with rd are new floaters, flashing lights, loss of peripheral vision, and decreased vision. It is possible to have an asymptomatic rd. The best way to be sure is to see in ophthalmologist and have a dilated exam done. Read more...