Difficulty bending knee after ACL surgery - is that supposed to happen?

Very common . Very common you'll require extensive rehab treatments and it won't feel like your regular leg for at least a year.

Related Questions

Had third ACL surgery about 4 months ago but I am havin lots of pain in my knee cap when I bend or straighten it out...what could be the problem?

2 possibilities. Did you have a bone-tendon-bone autograft? If your graft was taken from your own kneecap, there could be an injury to the kneecap. If not, scar tissue that causes decreased motion and quad weakness that is normal after surgery will make the kneecap work harder. Those conditions can cause patellofemoral pain. Your surgeon should determine which problem you have. Read more...

28 yr-old had ACL repair 10 years ago, and has felt leaning and off-balanced since a second surgery 5 yrs ago, and hopes to find a cure.....?

See Doc and PT. make sure your ortho doc is happy with the surgical outcome. If so, get a referral to see a Physical Therapist who can assess your gait and put you on a home exercise program. Read more...
Physical therapy PLUS. a referral to a Board Certified PHYSIATRIST..who can direct the Physical therapy. LEG LENGTH may be playing a role here. The physiatrist adds the M.D. Dimension to the Physical therapy program! Hope this helps! Dr Z. Read more...
Stability . Can't say for certain. You might have imbalance due to the development of OA more on one side more than the other or Possibly. from persistent instability. . Read more...
Be seen. It really comes down to the specific diagnosis. An exam, possibly a repeat MRI can show the likely cause and potential treatment options. Read more...
Full ortho eval. Initial radiographs would need to include weightbearing views: Bilateral standing AP, PA Rosenberg, full extension lateral and bilateral sunrise views. If any hint of poor alignment noted, then proceed with full hip-knee-ankle bilateral mechanical axis views to determine where weightbearing line from center of femoral head to ankle crosses at the knee joint. This will help determine if an osteotomy in such a young patient is indicated or should be considered. After imaging and a full examination for motion strength, and laxity, an MRI would help finalize any plans for potential surgery by delineating the degree of any cartilage or meniscal and ligamentous pathology. With history of hyperextension, a definite concern is whether posterolateral corner (LCL, popliteus and popliteofibular ligament) is also involved or injured/loose. Read more...
Need more data. We need to clarify what your evaluation has shown. Is there permanent damage to the knee. Discuss with your physician and see your specialist to help care for your knee. Read more...
Further info. need to have a new MRI to determine what the problem is. shouldn't still be painful. get another opinion. Read more...
May have instability associated with deformity. Your history suggests that in addition to your initial injremury of acl tear you may also have had an injury to your'posterolateral corner' of your knee.(lateral collateral ligament,popliteus tendon,popliteofibular ligament--occ. w/ a posterior cruciate ligament injury).These more complicated combined injuries often result in failure of 'routine' ACL reconstructive surgeries!My recommendation would be to see an experienced board certified ORS who specializes in knee surgery.Xrays of your extremity should include long standing films from hip to ankle to exclude a varus(bowlegged) deformity.This may necessitate an osteotomy with or without further knee ligament reconstructive surgery. Best of Luck! Read more...
Imbalance PostOp ACL. As a podiatrist in sports medicine, I am asked to treat scenarios such as this. The treatment team should include an orthopod to eval the disease process at the knee, a physical therapist to work on muscle weakness and gait faults, and a podiatrist when the first two feel that the foot structure or motion, or short leg syndrome, may be in the picture. Dr Rich Blake Good luck!! Read more...

Feeling a pop or crackle in back of knee after ACL surgery normal? Really worried about tearing or damaging graft

Orthopedic surgeon. Since you had ACL surgery, you should discuss this symptom with your orthopedic surgeon as he/she would probably want to examine you if you have any doubts about your knee. Read more...
Post op. You would have been sent home from surgery with specific post operation instructions. These instructions will include advice if you develop a complication. It is not wise to turn to strangers on the internet when you could have serious complications and you have a surgeon anxious to help. Read more...

What is the best wa6 to restrengthen a knee that has undergine ACL surgery?

ACL exercises. If the rest of the knee is healthy then squats are the single best exercise to rebuild knee strength after an acl. Read more...
Acl rehab. A graduated program of weight training and aerobic exercise like a bicycle or elliptical can be beneficial for strengthening the knee after acl reconstruction. There are rebab protocols online or check with your surgeon. Read more...

I just got ACL surgery done yesterday. When should I start bearing weight on that knee?

Variable. Every surgeon has his/her own preference for returning to walking and weight bearing, so ask your surgeon! for my reconstructions, i typically allow full weight and walking on the day of surgery. It is aided by crutches until the quad muscles can adequately function to allow walking. Normal working without a quad inhibition can take anywhere from a few days to a few months after surgery. Read more...

If I had ACL surgery and I fell a few dats later, should I get me knee checked out if it's in pain?

Yes. You are still within the "rehab" phase of your treatment and should be under the care of the treating surgeon. If i was your surgeon i would want to know these things! Read more...

I have recently had an ACL surgery 5months ago and I am starting to experience knee crackles every time I bend it. Is this normal?

Most likely. Noisy or grinding knees are rarely a concern unless accompanied by pain. The most common cause of knee grinding is altered mechanics within the patellofemoral joint causing the backside of the kneecap to rub against the groove in the femur. Quadriceps weakness after acl surgery can lead to these altered biomechanics. Continue your rehab, with a focus on quad and hamstring strengthening. Read more...
Knee. Yes this can be normal. If you had a patella tendon graft you can develop some crackling from the kneecap. If there is no pain or swelling then just watch it. If it gets worse get a reevaluation by your surgeon. Read more...
Probably. It may be related to scar tissue, or maltracking of the kneecap. It should continue to improve over time and with physical therapy. Read more...