How long until numbness goes away after wisdom teeth removal anesthesia?

Depends. The answer depends on the type and amount of anesthesia used and the proximity of the nerve to the extracted tooth. If you feel your numbness is lasting longer than normal, beyond 12 hours, contact your dental provider for further examination.
Depends. It all depends on which local anesthetic was used. Different ones have differnent lengths of action. Pure Lidocaine should be gone in an hour, where longer acting ones can last the better part of the day. Usually within 8-12 hours, things begin to wake up. Sometimes the trauma, swelling can affect that absorption of the anesthetic and can delay things. But by 24 hours things should be all gone.
Varies. Some local anesthetics wear off within 30 minutes, while other are specifically designed to be active for up to 20 hours. It depends on the type and location of the drug. Talk to your anesthesiologist or dentist about medications that they will use.
It varies! It depends on which medication was used to numb the area. Some medications last longer than others. Lidocaine doesn't last as long as marcaine. I would anticipate you would have several hours of numbness, but beyond that it is hard to say. Epinephrine may prolong the numbness if it is added to the local anesthesia. Rest assured the effects will wear off eventually.
In few hrs. It depends what medication was was used, long acting local may lost 4 hrs or more after completion of surgery, most of the time only couple of hrs.

Related Questions

How long does the numbness last after wisdom teeth removal?

Two to 8 hours. Most common local anesthetic used is Lidocaine with Epinephrine lasting 2 to 4 hours. If a longer acting anesthetic was used it could last 6- 8 yours. Read more...

How much time will numbness and bleeding last after wisdom teeth removal?

Wisdom teeth. After wisdom teeth extractions the numbness and bleeding my last for a couple of hours. In case it lasts longer than you need to call your dentist right away. Read more...
Up to 7 days . Wisdom teeth removal is a surgical procedure and is not completely risk-free. Numbness up to 4 hours. Pain, swelling and infection following surgery is usually at its worst 24 – 48 hours after surgery. After that it should subside more and more every day and after 7 days stop. See your dentist or an oral surgeon for post-op appointment. Read more...

What to do if I have numbness after wisdom teeth removal?

Numbness. If the numbness last longer than 3 hours post op (id does not go away) you need to return to the oral surgeon ASAP. Paresthesia may last 6 wks to 6 mos or be permanent. The sooner it is diagnosed the better the outcome and sometimes micro surgery is needed to reattach the two ends of the nerve if the nerve was severed. pinched/crushed nerves recover w/o surgery. Read more...

I have numbness after wisdom teeth removal. Is this normal?

Yes. Prolonged numbness following wisdom teeth removal can be a complication. The action of the surgery can lead to trama to the nerves as well as local swelling in the jaw placing pressure on nerve will result in this numbness. Most are short lived and resolves when the area heals. Some can linger for months when the nerve regenerates. Talk to your oral surgeon. Good luck. . Read more...
Numbness. Numbness after a wisdom tooth should be reported to the extracting dentist ASAP. This may be a sign of nerve trauma or damage and needs to be checked out. . Read more...

What to do for pain and numbness after wisdom teeth removal?

Call your dentist. You failed to mention how long ago were the wisdom teeth removed? Please call the dentist who removed your wisdom teeth. He\she will know best how to advise you regarding appropriate pain medication and follow up visits to monitor healing. Read more...
See your dentist. You should see your dentist if you have signs of infection, a tingling sensation and numbness in the tongue or lower lip. Read more...

Is general anesthesia ok for wisdom teeth removal?

Ok. Ok, but in most cases it is not nessasary. Talk to your dentist for the best solution. Read more...
Excellent. Most patients prefer to be asleep for wisdom teeth extraction. You should know the options. Best advice, see a board certified oral surgeon for exam/recommendations. Read more...

General or local anesthesia for wisdom teeth removal?

Depends on you. If you can keep calm a local can be sufficient. If you need general make sure they have a board certified anesthesiologist in the office and the office has a full compliment of anesthesia emergency ications. Read more...
Wisdom teeth removal. In my office, the vast majority of patients are fine with local anesthesia (and Sweet Air=Laughing Gas=Nitrous Oxide\Oxygen). Some prefer IV sedation in which case I refer them out to an Oral Surgeon. It is a personal decision and best discussed with the surgeon prior to the procedure in order to determine what is best for you. For some, especially the apprehensive, IV sedation is the way to go! Read more...
I had my. wisdom tooth pulled recently, teeth cleaning same time so local had plenty of time to set up. Local injection after topical benzocaine, very easy. Tooth broke during extraction, roots removed separately. No pain, glad after not all doped up on drugs. Didn't even fill prescription for narcotics. Recomm. Read more...
Everyone's different. Some wisdom teeth roll right out. Some require significant surgical manipulation. Discuss your individual problem set with your Oral Surgeon and request his/her recommendation. Read more...
Depends. If there are no contraindications local is acceptable and reasonable choice. . Read more...
Depends. Some prefer only local anesthesia; most, however opt for general. A nice way to go is conscious sedation (many consider this general) using an I.V. technique. This provides deep enough anesthesia to make things comfortable, as well as amnesia about the event. Discuss it with your Oral Surgeon to determine what is just right for you. Good Luck. Read more...
Pain & Anxiety Free. The local anesthesia is used either by itself or in combination with one or more of the following: nitrous oxide, oral sedation, I.V. sedation or general anesthesia. Your oral surgeon may use any type of anesthesia, depending on the expected complexity of the wisdom tooth case and your comfort. Read more...
Depends. Depends on patient, location of teeth, insurance. For best results, see an oral surgeon for exam/options. The oral surgeon has the widest array of anesthetic and surgical options. Read more...

Do they use general anesthesia for wisdom teeth removal?

Maybe. General anesthesia would be used in a hospital setting. In an oral surgeons office, they would use conscious sedation, which means you will be breathing on your own, but will have no memory of the procedure. General anesthesia requires intubation and a machine that breathes for you. Read more...
Yes. Yes. General anesthesia is routine used by board certified oral & maxillofacial surgeons. Make sure your doc is an oral surgeon. Read more...

How often is general anesthesia needed for wisdom teeth removal?

Anesthesia. Rarely. General anesthesia may be used when removing wisdom teeth associated with complications and extensive dental procedures. Severely anxious and intellectually challenged individuals need general anesthesia. Read more...
Not often. It is more common to use conscious sedation and local anesthesia, or in many cases just local anesthesia. There are usually many factors that would be involved to warrant general for that procedure. Read more...
Varies. The manner in which any extraction is done is a decision made by the patient and the dentist. Some factors to be considered are the difficulty of the extraction, the general health of the patient, whether an infection is present, and the type of the patient in question. Read more...
Talk to Dentist. Most teeth extractions can be done under local anesthesia with a cooperative patient. If there are especially impacted teeth then some sedation might be indicated. I don't even remember the procedure after a little dose of valium. If you have concerns please contact your dentist and discuss these fears with him. Good luck. Read more...