How to tell if it is deep vein thrombosis or calf muscular pain and tendonitis?

Ultrasound of veins. It is sometimes very difficult to distinguish between DVT and calf muscular pain simply by physical findings or history. The definitive diagnostic test is a venous duplex ultrasound which will show the veins behind the knee (popliteal) to see if there is a clot.

Related Questions

Does deep vein thrombosis hurt? Would you know it if you had it in calf?

Sometimes. DVTs commonly present as swelling and pain in the calf area. However, they're not always associated with these symptoms which can make them more difficult to detect. . Read more...
Usually yes. Usually acute DVT can cause a painful swelling. Venous ultrasound is commonly used to detect deep vein thrombosis in calf or other parts of extremities. Read more...

Woke up yesterday morning with pain in back of left calf, almost where my knee bends. No swelling/redness. Deep vein thrombosis?

Calf pain. Any injury? Did you do any strenous work or run day before it start? If no trauma, no strenous activity, no swelling or rash then try ice for day or two. If it is constant then get evaluated. Read more...
Leg Pain. Not likely unless you have been sedentary for prolonged period (e.g. Traveling); have had previous blood clots; or have cancer, recent trauma or surgery, all of which are typical risk factors for leg venous clots. Read more...

I have constant aching pain in left calf and sometimes thigh. Worse at night. Doc has ruled out Lyme disease and deep vein thrombosis. What now?

More evaluation. If your symptoms worsen with exertion (claudication), you may need an evaluation for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). While these may be simply muscle cramps, be sure to talk with your doctor about sciatica (pain that originates from lower back via nerves traveling to the leg), tendon rupture, and arterial aneurysm. Your doctor may also want you to see a Rheumatologist. Read more...

Would deep vein thrombosis cause pain when straightening leg out?

Maybe. Doctors often examine for increased pain with certain movements to help determine if a deep vein thrombosis is present; however these tests are not very accurate. Read more...
Is possible. Typically, the pain of a DVT is there all of the time but is made worse with movement (straightening and bending). If you have leg pain and swelling, you should get it checked out. If you are worried about a dvt, you would be wise to get it checked out anyway--if for no other reason than peace of mind. Read more...
See a doctor. If you think you may have deep vein thrombosis you should see a doctor and have an ultrasound test to determine if it is there is one present. Untreated deep vein thrombosis can lead to serious medical conditions and even death. Read more...

Can you do massage on someone who has deep vein thrombosis in their leg?

Lighten up. Definitely do not massage the leg that has the deep vein thrombosis since a loose clot could break free and travel. Leave the other leg alone since an undiagnosed smaller clot could exist there also. People with DVT are usually on blood thinners so bruising can occur with vigorous pressure elsewhere, so be careful and lighten up on the pressure. Read more...

How do you treat deep vein thrombosis of the lower leg?

Blood thinners. Most dvts of the legs are treated with blood thinners for at least 3 months, depending on their presumed cause. If the DVT exists higher up in the pelvic veins or there is significant swelling of the legs with a DVT of the veins in the thigh, there is some evidence to suggest use of clot-busting medications (i.e., thrombolytics) may improve long term outcomes. Consult with a vascular surgeon. Read more...
Dvt. Traditional treatment is with anti coagulation therapy for 6 months. Some may advocate losing the clot if it extends to the iliac veins to prevent long term problems but the long term data is not necessarily there yet. Read more...

How best to treat deep vein thrombosis of the lower leg?

Blood thinners. It depends, to some extent, on where the clot is. It is possible to have a deep vein thrombosis that is so far down the leg, is so small, and is in such a small vein that we might treat it with anti-inflammatory medicines and compression stockings. If the clot is in a larger vein and is bigger, then we treat those with blood thinners for a minimum of 3 months and use compression stockings too. Read more...
Anticoagulation . Tibial vein DVT has been a controversial subject. Current recommendations call for systemic anticoagulation for 3 months (often started with Lovenox (enoxaparin) and bridged onto coumadin). At three months a repeat ultrasound is done to determine if another 3 months would be appropriate due to persistent clot. Don't forget the compression stockings to avoid post phlebitis syndrome. Read more...
Broad topic. Anticoagulation still the baseline therapy for an acute DVT. In recent years, we have been more aggressive in selected cases to intervene with pharmacomechanical treatments (e.g. ANGIOJET and t-PA) to achieve more rapid clearance and preserve valve function. This is with the intent to reduce the incidence of post-phlebtic syndrome. Duration of anticoagulation depends on many factors. Read more...