Which is better: angioplasty or a bypass surgery?

Depends. Too broad a question. Pts with poor heart function , mutiple vessels invoved, diabetics and left main involvement tend to be treated by bypass. The data suggests that the higher risk pts need complete revascularization and this is usually achieved by surger . With drug coated stents and improved technology the gap has closed and either may be suitable. Risks/benefits/alternatives should be discussed.
MoreImportantIssues. Concur with dr. Rasak answers but both approaches are only partial treatment options for symptoms of advanced artery disease, do not cure, indeed complicate the disease & add additional problems. Wiser approach: aggressively change the internal drivers of artery disease & only consider PTCA or surgery as a partial adjunct after the drivers are reversed, if judged needed (often no longer needed).

Related Questions

Which is better angioplasty or bypass surgery?

Depends. It depends on what patient with what conditions. For example, if a patient comes in while they're having a heart attack, going to the cath lab for an angioplasty is much better than a bypass operation. In diabetics with two or more vessels blocked, bypass is much better. It depends on the person's medical condition and the number of vessels really. Read more...
Depends. For diabetics with mufti vessel disease cabg. In many other situations they can be equally effective. Talk to your cardiologist. Read more...

How are angioplasty and bypass surgery different?

Approach. Angioplasty is usually done through an artery, and is called a percutaneous approach. Bypass surgery is done in the or, and requires a surgical incision for access. Read more...

What is the price range for angioplasty or bypass surgery?

Prices. prices would be very difficult to quote due to differences in insurance companies, hospital charges, geographic differences (that do affect costs) and other factors. Read more...

After 2 mi's, 8 cath's, 6 stents and 2 angioplasty's in the past 2 years, should I be planning on bypass surgery in the near future?

You can't tell. There is no way to know for sure, but it is one of many possibilities. Read more...
No. You need to lower your cholesterol an consider a plant based diet. Go to cnn.Com and look up the last heart attack. Read more...
It is possible. It all depends on how you continue to do with the stents and how your disease progresses. Assuming you do everything right, meds, lifestyle changes, you may avoid surgery all along. If your disease continues to progress you may end up needing bypass surgery. Your cardiologist will help you decide on the best option and timing. Read more...
Not necessarily. Time to change your diet. Read "prevent and reverse heart disease" by dr caldwell esselstyn. There is good evidence that a whole foods, plant based diet, that is low in fat can prevent and reverse coronary artery disease. It is a 'do no harm' intervention that could change your metabolism and propensity to develop atherosclerotic changes in your vessels. Read more...
Yes. Hopefully what you have already had done will last for a while longer but ultimately it sounds likely you will have surgery. The good news is this should be durable for you. Read more...

My dad has a triple vessel. Should he have an angioplasty or bypass surgery?

It depends. What vessels what size what degrees of stenosis what other risks -diabetes age etc how functional is the heart function-ejection fraction=squeezing status. Read more...

What are the pros and cons of balloon angioplasty and bypass surgery?

Depends on cause. Balloon angioplasty works best for localized narrowing in an artery. It is performed by inserting a catheter (long tube) in an artery, usually at the groin. The balloon stretches out the narrowed area to open it. Recovery time is just a day or two, much shorter than a bypass. Bypasses are used for total blockage of an artery, where a balloon can't get in or when balloon angioplasty has failed. Read more...

Which is best, bypass surgery or angioplasty for person above 75 years (7-8 blocks in RCA, DIAG), diabetic & had stroke 2 yr back (not fully recovered)?

AngioPlasty or CABG. That is normally a question best answered by a cardiac surgeon. As a rule, angioplasty is less invasive but in hardened arteries it may lead to rupture during procedure and eventual surgery. Stents may also work in some situations. With your history of diabetes and stroke, the risks for any surgery are higher than normal. Please seek a second opinion if you have any doubts. Good luck. Read more...