10 doctors weighed in:
Is it okay to have a chest X-ray without covering your genitals?
10 doctors weighed in

Dr. Gerald Mandell
Nuclear Medicine
5 doctors agree
In brief: Keep covered
Amount of radiation decreases with distance organ is away from xray beam. However any radiation exposure that is not needed is unwise.
Keep lead over gonads when not body part necessary to be visualized for diagnosis.

In brief: Keep covered
Amount of radiation decreases with distance organ is away from xray beam. However any radiation exposure that is not needed is unwise.
Keep lead over gonads when not body part necessary to be visualized for diagnosis.
Dr. Gerald Mandell
Dr. Gerald Mandell
Thank
Dr. Michael Gabor
Diagnostic Radiology
4 doctors agree
In brief: It never hurts
to maximize radiation safety, but practically speaking the pelvis receives virtually no scatter radiation from a properly collimated chest xray.

In brief: It never hurts
to maximize radiation safety, but practically speaking the pelvis receives virtually no scatter radiation from a properly collimated chest xray.
Dr. Michael Gabor
Dr. Michael Gabor
Thank
Dr. Edward Druy
Radiology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes, but
Best practice would be to shield your genitals anytime you receive an x-ray or ct scan.
The radiation dose is small, but accumulative over your lifetime. You should ask the technologist performing the study for a shield.

In brief: Yes, but
Best practice would be to shield your genitals anytime you receive an x-ray or ct scan.
The radiation dose is small, but accumulative over your lifetime. You should ask the technologist performing the study for a shield.
Dr. Edward Druy
Dr. Edward Druy
Thank
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology
In brief: Probably
If the machine is up to date, it will have a well focused beam of lower intensity due to electronic recording rather than xray film. The genitals are not in the beam - it is possible that there might be a little scatter but this would be extremely little.
The only real concern, even with older machines, is alterations in the genetics of sperm , if you are no longer reproducing, that isnt a worry.

In brief: Probably
If the machine is up to date, it will have a well focused beam of lower intensity due to electronic recording rather than xray film. The genitals are not in the beam - it is possible that there might be a little scatter but this would be extremely little.
The only real concern, even with older machines, is alterations in the genetics of sperm , if you are no longer reproducing, that isnt a worry.
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Thank
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