6 doctors weighed in:
Can't sleep, but feel jet-lagged. How do I get rested?
6 doctors weighed in

Dr. Cornelia Franz
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree
In brief: Sleeping
Is what you need.
We are not meant to be chronically sleep deprived. See your doctor and discuss your sleep patterns...Short term melatonin nightly can help. It often helps one get to sleep but not necessarily stay asleep. Acupuncture and chinese medicine can help. Meditation has been shown to have consistent positive results. Homeopathy can help as well. You need a good evaluation. Sleep=rest.

In brief: Sleeping
Is what you need.
We are not meant to be chronically sleep deprived. See your doctor and discuss your sleep patterns...Short term melatonin nightly can help. It often helps one get to sleep but not necessarily stay asleep. Acupuncture and chinese medicine can help. Meditation has been shown to have consistent positive results. Homeopathy can help as well. You need a good evaluation. Sleep=rest.
Dr. Cornelia Franz
Dr. Cornelia Franz
Thank
Dr. Alan Ali
Psychiatry
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Can't sleep
Talk to your doctor about this & see if you need assessed for secondary insomnia (insomnia due to other organic or psychological factors) which can be treated.
Meanwhile you can try the sleep hygiene techniques.

In brief: Can't sleep
Talk to your doctor about this & see if you need assessed for secondary insomnia (insomnia due to other organic or psychological factors) which can be treated.
Meanwhile you can try the sleep hygiene techniques.
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali
Thank
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Melatonin?
I agree w dr. Franz.
1. Keep a regular bedtime & wakening time (to include weekends). Get up the same time each day, regardless of what time you fell asleep. 2. Make a regular, relaxing bedtime routine. Relaxing rituals prior to bedtime may include a warm bath or shower, aroma therapy, reading, or listening to gentle music. 3. Sleep in a dark, quiet, cool room on comfortable mattress & pillows.

In brief: Melatonin?
I agree w dr. Franz.
1. Keep a regular bedtime & wakening time (to include weekends). Get up the same time each day, regardless of what time you fell asleep. 2. Make a regular, relaxing bedtime routine. Relaxing rituals prior to bedtime may include a warm bath or shower, aroma therapy, reading, or listening to gentle music. 3. Sleep in a dark, quiet, cool room on comfortable mattress & pillows.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Heidi Fowler
4. Use the bedroom only for sleep & sex. Have work materials, computers, & TVs in another room. 5. Finish eating at least 2-3 hs prior to your regular bedtime. 6. No caffeine within 6 hours; alcohol & smoking within 2 hrs of bedtime. Alcoholism is a major cause for insomnia. 7. Exercise regularly; finish a few hours before bedtime. 8. No naps. 9. Go to bed only when sleepy. Lay in bed only for sleeping, not for work or watching TV. 10. Designate another time to write down problems & possible solutions in the late afternoon or early evening, not close to bedtime. 11. After 10-15 minutes of not being able to get to sleep, go to another room to read or watch TV until sleepy. Consider chamomile tea before bed. Warm milk. Lavender oil in bath or lavender scent on pillow. Melatonin is very helpful. Acupuncture often works well for insomnia.
Dr. Ravi Chand
Psychiatry
In brief: Jet Lag
Jet lag is a shift phase sleep disorder. Generally, each time zone travelled, the brain needs 1 day to adjust to the new time zone.
For example, if you travel 8 to 10 time zones from us to asia, it will take the circadian clock approx 8 to 10days to adjust. Light is the biggest zeitgber or clue giver and will adjust your clock. Melatonin and light therapy can be used to adjust circadian rhythm.

In brief: Jet Lag
Jet lag is a shift phase sleep disorder. Generally, each time zone travelled, the brain needs 1 day to adjust to the new time zone.
For example, if you travel 8 to 10 time zones from us to asia, it will take the circadian clock approx 8 to 10days to adjust. Light is the biggest zeitgber or clue giver and will adjust your clock. Melatonin and light therapy can be used to adjust circadian rhythm.
Dr. Ravi Chand
Dr. Ravi Chand
Thank
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