Can an L5 s1 hernia heal on its own?

Herniated disc? If you do not have nerve compression resulting in pain or bladder/bowel dysfunction, your body will eventually form scar tissue around the new place the disc rests and the symptoms will improve. This can take 2-3 months.

Related Questions

Hello, lm from macedonia and l need a help because l really don't know how to get health l have 27 age, and l have discuss hernia l4, L5 l5-s1 pls, help?

Sciatica. True sciatica is leg pain that shoots from back, down the leg past the knee. This mimics the path of the sciatic nerve, thus it's name. Young patients more likely to have herniated disc. Older patients, pressure from arthritic spurs. All can be treated non-surgically if not getting worse. Physical therapy, tylenol (acetaminophen) or aleve, nerve blocks, the combination works 80% of the time. Read more...

I just discovered a ~5mm L5-S1 hernia. I workout moderately at the gym 4 times/week-1h. Is it true that flexing is bad in my case? How about crunches?

Disc herniation? While flexing is thought to potentially increase risk of worsening a disc herniation.. It is not necessarily bad; especially if it isn't causing you more pain. I would be cautious with squatting exercises and recommend working on core strength (back/abdominals). Over overdoing repetitive flexion activities in the gym if possible as a precaution. Learn a Mckenzie program. Hope that helps! Read more...

How many kilos is it ok to lift at the gym considering l have a L5-S1 ~5mm hernia? I haven't had any sciatica problem from it. I'm 5'2" and 110 lbs.

See a physiatrist. It is wise of you to investigate these limitations. However, this isn't something that can be answered generally, and requires an understanding of your body habitus, history of training, planned activities, etc. A Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation specialist can assist you in assessing your overall limitations by both evaluating your various tests and your physical examination. Read more...

Need doctor's help! Will L5 s1 cause hernia type groin pain?

Yes, it is possible. But sensory nerves in this area originate from higher levels, so it is not very likely. Read more...

Are there non steroidal and non surgical treatments for a l5-s1 disc hernia?

Therapy. You can try Ibuprofen over the counter and physical therapy as a first line treatment of a herniated disk without surgery. If you fail therapy and your pain persists, you may need surgery. Try to do physical therapy first. Williams and mckenzie exercises help quite a bit. Read more...
Yes. Most (>90%) disc herniations will get better on their own without surgical intervention. Rest, gentle stretching, judicious use of nsaids and time will heal most of these. When they don't improve or worsen then you may want to go to the next level and seek further non-operative treatments. Surgery is really the last resort. Read more...
Yes. There is conservative management and surgical management. If the disc is causing weakness than conservative management is not recommended. The best thing is to discuss the options with a neurosurgeon every case is different and the management is dependent upon the size of the disc herniation the symptoms and the patient. Read more...
Time mckenzie. Mckenzie therapy, iin canada chymopapain older treatment no longer available in us look up the sport trial for disc treatments surgery is very effective with low risks for leg pain. Read more...
Yes. A disc hernia requires no treatment, unless it is causing symptoms. Symptoms result when a herniated disc is pinching or compressing an adjacent nerve. Physical therapy, avoidance of activities that provoke the pain, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicine are often helpful. More than 50% of patients will eventually have complete relief of symptoms without requiring surgery or steroids. Read more...

I have bulging in l5-s1 causing major sciatica l5-l4 is almost as bad slight stnosis in my t spine and small hernias I take MS cotin 30-2/day still pa?

So what is the ? You have a problem no doubt / these are hard things to treat discuss with your doctor. Read more...
Spine Injury. This chronic pain in the distribution as you suggested is the result of an irritated nerve or facet joints or other injury typically in the lumbar spine (low back) which are caused by herniated disks, spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease, etc requiring further evaluation by a pain/spine specialist. You may be a candidate for epidural steroid injections for relief. Read more...