6 doctors weighed in:

Why won't my dentist drain my dental abscess?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mark Venincasa
Dentistry - Cosmetic
2 doctors agree

In brief: There are options

Draining a dental abscess is only required with the most serious infections.
Dental abscesses can often be controlled by an oral antibiotic followed by more definitive care.

In brief: There are options

Draining a dental abscess is only required with the most serious infections.
Dental abscesses can often be controlled by an oral antibiotic followed by more definitive care.
Dr. Mark Venincasa
Dr. Mark Venincasa
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Dr. John Leander Po
Internal Medicine - Infectious Disease
2 doctors agree

In brief: Too dangerous?

It's likely several factors, some of which may not be evident.
Procedures all come with risks and benefits-it may just be that the abscess is in a location that may affect delicate nerves or it's too large to do it without anaesthesia. Alternatively, your dentist may not be qualified to perform the procedure; it may be a job of an oromaxillofacial surgeon (omfs).

In brief: Too dangerous?

It's likely several factors, some of which may not be evident.
Procedures all come with risks and benefits-it may just be that the abscess is in a location that may affect delicate nerves or it's too large to do it without anaesthesia. Alternatively, your dentist may not be qualified to perform the procedure; it may be a job of an oromaxillofacial surgeon (omfs).
Dr. John Leander Po
Dr. John Leander Po
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In brief: It may be too early

In addition to above answer, there are other factors.
Infection go through stages. First, the toxins released by the bacteria and dead tissue cause inflammation which is associated with tissue swelling and pain. There is nothing to drain then. As more white blood cells migrate to the infection some will die along with your tissue causing cavitation filled with pus, & that is the time to drain it.

In brief: It may be too early

In addition to above answer, there are other factors.
Infection go through stages. First, the toxins released by the bacteria and dead tissue cause inflammation which is associated with tissue swelling and pain. There is nothing to drain then. As more white blood cells migrate to the infection some will die along with your tissue causing cavitation filled with pus, & that is the time to drain it.
Dr. Simon Rosenberg
Dr. Simon Rosenberg
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