Does 'swallowing' dental plaque result in heart attack or other heart issues?

I don't believe. That there is a general afirmative consensus about this within the general medical community.
Dental Plaque. Dental plaque is made up of bacteria that normally reside in your mouth, and is composed mainly of streptococcus mutans. Since your saliva contains this bacteria, you swallow the bacteria every day. It is not the same as the "plaque" that forms in your arteries, which is an atheroma http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atheroma.

Related Questions

Does swallowing dental plaque causes clotting and heart disease?

Plaques. Dental plaque and the plaque that occurs in the blood vessels of the heart are not one in the same. Swallowing dental plaque does not cause heart disease in the way that you are implying. While there is some controversy, there seems to be a link between patients who have periodontal (gum) problems and heart disease. It's not entirely understood at this point but appears related to inflammation. Read more...
Plaque Eww. Plaque is a descriptive term which is a conglomerate of things, like biofilm, bacteria, food debris (dental plaque), blood cells, etc. They have isolated identical bacteria from dental plaque and atherosclerotic plaques, but swallowing dental plaque does not lead to heart disease or everyone would have heart disease. The main problem is related to deep inflammation not the plaque itself. Read more...

What is the best way to stabilize soft arterial plaque that every adult has in order to prevent a stroke, PE, heart attack, etc.?

Excellent Question. Statins- and other drugs and nutritional supplements that lower your LDL particle number and favorably alter your LDL pattern as much as possible. Omega 3 supplements to help lower triglycerides and change LDL pattern when appropriate. Anti- inflammatory diet- avoid sugar, high fructose corn syrup and the like- speak with a nutritionist. There are other suggestions but this is a good start! Read more...

Could dissolving with effective supplementation "plaque" from inflamed arteries dislodge and cause stroke or heart attack pre-maturely? %?

No. Stating drugs have been shown to decrease plaque. Most OTC supplements have not been proven. If you have plaque cussing symptoms you should talk to your doctor about treatments. Don't take a chance. Dissolving plaque should not increase the risk of a stroke or vascular event. Make sure you don't risk your life/health on unproven claims. Read more...
No. This is kind of a semantic answer. Dissolving plaque is rare to begin with and a realistic goal is stability. It is best to think of this plaque dissolving more like being smooth out over time. But if there are pits/nooks/crannies (call it what you like) there can still be tumbling blood that can clot and cause stroke. Any symptom should be discussed with your neurologist. Read more...

I'm getting a coranary cta this week. Doc said it will show arteries & heart. Will this show if I had a heart attack or plaque build up in arteries?

CTA for risk. It will look for narrowing of arteries that suggest there is plaque. It will not show a heart attack but will help with identifying risk. Other tests like an ekg would tell if you've had a heart attack. Read more...

My dad has "40% stenosis at it's origin" in LAD & 40% plaque in the OM1 of LCx. He takes aspirin, beta blocker & chol. Drugs. His heart attack risk?

At risk. You father has non-obstructive coronary disease. Plaques can rupture and result in heart attack unpredictably. You cannot make this risk go away but you can reduce it by using a high potency statin drug, regardless of his cholesterol level, daily low dose aspirin, not smoking, and doing daily moderate exercise. Stents or Bypass surgery will not reduce his risk for non-obstructive disease. Read more...
Manageable. If he has no symptoms, the recommended medical regimen includes the medications he is taking. The only addition, based on his risk factors, would be an ACE inhibitor (highly recommended for diabetes, but may also be helpful otherwise). He should not smoke and all around him should not smoke. If he can be active in moderation, that's good! He should be aware of symptoms and notify his doc ASAP! Read more...
Risk assessment. This is a difficult question since most estimates are in patients without known CAD. As a starting point assume 20% 10 year risk of an event that can be modified by not smoking, taking statins, controlling blood pressure and weight and exercise 30 mins at least 3x per week. He sounds like the meds are appropriate. The % above and location is not as important as the fact that he has CAD. Read more...