Transvaginal sonogram safe if placenta previa?

Yes. A transvaginal sonogram is typically the best way to diagnose placenta previa. The exam should be gentle and fairly fast. There may be some spotting after the exam. But, it is considered safe.
With care, yes. Carefully performed transvaginal sonograms can help confirm and delineate placenta previa diagnosed by transabdominal sonography. Only skilled operators should attempt this, though, as vaginal bleeding can be prompted by the ultrasound probe.

Related Questions

As my ultrasound result, it stated that im having a placenta previa totalis and myomauteri. What will I do? Is my unborn child be safe?

Yes. You willl have to be watched closely. If the placenta previa does not move your child will be born via csection. Hopefully your OB will discuss all this in detail with you. Read more...

Will vaginal spotting/bleeding stop placenta previa resolves? Does recurrent bleeding in 2nd tr indicate that placenta previa is unlikely to resolve?

Yes and no. Bleeding that is directly attributable to placenta previa should subside/cease once the previa resolves. However, bleeding in the setting of placenta previa is something that needs to be monitored VERY closely...like in the hospital under the direct care of an OB/GYN. The recurrent nature of the vaginal bleeding is not necessarily an indication that the previa won't resolve or less likely. Read more...
2 questions here. Answer to number one, not always. Answer number 2, not always. You will need periodic ultrasound monitoring to follow this issue and, most importantly, if you have significant bleeding, pain, or preterm labor get to hospital right away. Don't plan any trips. You need to be very careful or this may threaten the lives of both you and your baby. Follow your OBs advice and make sure you follow up. Read more...
Previa. True placental previa is a condition in which the placenta is attached to the womb and covers the cervical canal completely. A partial placenta previa is attached to the lower uterine segment, and overlaps the cervical canal only marginally. The latter can "resolve" as the pregnancy progresses, and eventually not cover any of the open cervical canal. Previas usually require a cesarean section . Read more...