Are muscle spasms common after a knee arthroscopy?

Thanks for asking! Following knee arthroscopy, muscle spasms are rare; quad weakness, anterior knee pain are more common; that said, calf spasm and/or pain must be evaluated carefully for an underlying blood clot.
Yes. Muscle spasms can occur following knee arthroscopy, particularly in the quadricep muscle, although they are common in the hamstrings and calf muscle as well. This is usually the result of swelling that accompanies the surgery. Icing and initiation of physical therapy usually resolves this.

Related Questions

Is knee arthroscopy a very common procedure?

Yes. Knee arthroscope surgery is very common. Usually it entails cleaning up the inside structures of the knee so the knee joint mechanically functions better. Read more...
Yes. Knee arthroscopy is a common procedure done for a variety of reasons. The most common reason is a meniscal tear or to assist in ligament repair. There are many reasons for knee arthroscopy, and there are many varying rehabilitation programs following the procedure. It is important to consult your orthopedist to discuss reasons and outcomes. Read more...
Yes. It is the most common orthopaedic procedure, with more than one million a year being performed in the US. Read more...

What is the expected recovery time after a knee arthroscopy?

Depends. Knee arthroscopy is highly dependent on the procedure being performed along with it. Trimming a torn meniscus can lead to immediate relief and return to function while acl or PCL reconstructions take 8-9 months to recover. It also depends on your conditioning before surgery. Pain from quad weakness and tendinitis will not improve at all after surgery. It will depend more on rehab. Read more...
Varies by procedure. If it is for a meniscus tear, most people are moderately sore for 3-5 days. Swelling improves starting around day 4 or so. Most people take pain meds for 2-10 days. Some take no narcotics at all. Crutches for a day or two then sometimes a cane. Most are done with these by first week. Limping around for a week or two is common. Many can do mild to moderate activity in 10-14 days. Best by 4-6 weeks. Read more...

How to treat pain 7 months after a knee arthroscopy?

Depends. Depends on why you had arthroscopy to start with. Uncomplicated meniscal tears usual improve in 2-6 weeks. If there is arthritis present the pain may never completely resolve. For more involved arthroscopic procedures it is anyone's quess as to how long the pain may persists. Your surgeon is the best one to advise in this matter. Read more...
Postop knee pain. The knee pain should be worked up to include but not excluded to same sided hip pain and lower back pain; specific to the knee quadriceps eccentric weakness can be a common cause for persisting knee pain; an MRI is needed to look for a residual bakers/popliteal cyst; evaluate for any subchondral bone marrow edema or insufficiency fracture and possible re tear of a meniscus. Read more...

How long after a knee arthroscopy (keyhole surgery) before you can go on a long journey by car as a passenger?

1 week. After your sutures are removed in a week or so postoperatively you can travel. Take an Aspirin a day and take frequent breaks to walk around to prevent deep vein thrombosis or a blood clot in your legs. Read more...

Does it hurt to get a knee arthroscopy done?

Varies. After any surgery there is usually some discomfort associated with swelling and the procedure performed. Icing, medication as needed and starting physical therapy immediately following the surgery will decrease the discomfort significantly. If you were in a lot of pain prior to the surgery you will probably find you are in less pain after the 2nd-3rd week post operatively. Read more...
Some degree of disco. Some degree of discomfort will be there based on what was done at the time of arthroscopy; the post op regimen suggested. Read more...
Yes. Any surgical procedure is associated with pain. The severity and duration of pain depend on the extent of tissue damage due to the procedure. Arthroscopy should not be too bad. Read more...

How long could knee arthroscopy recovery take?

Depends on Diagnosis. Arthroscopy is a method used to treat knee problems - a wide variety of procedures can be done 'through the scope' depending on what is seen - from simple 'clean out' of a meniscus tear to meniscus repair to cartilage healing procedures. The recovery can be from a week or so to many months. Ask your surgeon exactly what the plan is after surgery so you best understand what to expect. Read more...
It Depends. On how active you are and how much was done during surgery. For a routine knee scope i typically allow my patients back to work in 3-4 days if they have a sedentary job. Otherwise, most people can start getting back to work at 2-3 weeks depending on their job. Strengthening of the quadriceps muscle is key as this shuts down with knee surgery of any kind. Most people are near full by 4 weeks. Read more...

What can you do at home after knee arthroscopy?

Thigh/calf exercises. Routine knee arthroscopy to address common injuries such as mensical tears and cartilage lesions generally allow for several basic activities geared to help prevent postoperative complications. Performing thigh muscle contractions via a straight leg raise (knee kept straight) helps prevent loss of extension and helps prepare for ambulation. Calf pumping exercises help prevent blood clots (dvt). Read more...
Work on motion. I usually don't prescribe pt for a simple knee arthroscopy. Usually a stationary bike is sufficient to help with achieving good range of motion. Read more...
Home exercises. There are simple exercises to do after knee arthroscopy at home. These can be found on the internet. You can work on range of motion of your knee, do straight leg raises, and quadriceps isometric contractions. Read more...
Knee arthroscopy. Knee arthroscopy exercises include closed chain exercises such as stationary cycling, and basic quadriceps exercises such as straight leg raises, quad sets and patellar mobilizations; short arc quads can also be initiated. Read more...