9 doctors weighed in:

Can you let me know how many patients get lymphedema from having lymphnodes removed when cancer spread?

9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Barry Rosen
Surgery
8 doctors agree

In brief: Less-and-Less Now

Lymphedema secondary to breast cancer surgery is more related to the number of lymph nodes removed +/- radiation to the armpit rather than the presence or absence of cancer within the nodes.
When a traditional axillary dissection is performed, the risk is app. 25%. This rate is <5% if only a few nodes are removed, as we often do with sentinel lymph node biopsy.

In brief: Less-and-Less Now

Lymphedema secondary to breast cancer surgery is more related to the number of lymph nodes removed +/- radiation to the armpit rather than the presence or absence of cancer within the nodes.
When a traditional axillary dissection is performed, the risk is app. 25%. This rate is <5% if only a few nodes are removed, as we often do with sentinel lymph node biopsy.
Dr. Barry Rosen
Dr. Barry Rosen
Thank
2 doctors agree

In brief: Low

Depends on where the lymph nodes are being removed.
Full axillary lymph node surgery has a 10% or less chance of lymphedema. Full axillary lymph node surgery is not as common any more. Groin lymph node dissection could also rarely cause leg lymphedema.

In brief: Low

Depends on where the lymph nodes are being removed.
Full axillary lymph node surgery has a 10% or less chance of lymphedema. Full axillary lymph node surgery is not as common any more. Groin lymph node dissection could also rarely cause leg lymphedema.
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Aaron Milstone
Board Certified, Internal Medicine - Pulmonology
23 years in practice
1M people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors