9 doctors weighed in:

How does my dr know for sure I don't have colon cancer?

9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jan Rakinic
Surgery - Colorectal
3 doctors agree

In brief: Has he/she looked?

While the great majority of colorectal cancers take years to arise from polyps, there are a few situations in which cancers develop faster, and may not go the polyp route.
These include inflammatory bowel disease and some family genetic dosorders, like lynch syndrome. Talking with your doctor will help determine your risk level for colorectal cancer.

In brief: Has he/she looked?

While the great majority of colorectal cancers take years to arise from polyps, there are a few situations in which cancers develop faster, and may not go the polyp route.
These include inflammatory bowel disease and some family genetic dosorders, like lynch syndrome. Talking with your doctor will help determine your risk level for colorectal cancer.
Dr. Jan Rakinic
Dr. Jan Rakinic
Thank
Dr. Richard Orr
Surgery - Oncology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Colonoscopy

In experienced hands, a normal colonoscopy rules out colon cancer in almost all patients.

In brief: Colonoscopy

In experienced hands, a normal colonoscopy rules out colon cancer in almost all patients.
Dr. Richard Orr
Dr. Richard Orr
Thank
Dr. Steven Ginsberg
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology

In brief: Can't for certain

All diagnostic tests have what is called a false negative rate, meaning that a test designed to look for something didn't find the something even though it is there.
If you have had colonoscopy or a barium enema that showed nothing, that is the best you can do for now.

In brief: Can't for certain

All diagnostic tests have what is called a false negative rate, meaning that a test designed to look for something didn't find the something even though it is there.
If you have had colonoscopy or a barium enema that showed nothing, that is the best you can do for now.
Dr. Steven Ginsberg
Dr. Steven Ginsberg
Thank
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