Muscle loss after arthroscopic knee surgery?

Very common. Quad muscle atrophy after knee surgery is very common and often overlooked as a continuing source of problems. Several months of routine thigh strengthening exercises are needed post-op to return to 100%.
Atrophy. Common but potentially prevented or at least lessened by low impact exercises as soon as you doctor allows. The more invasive the procedure, the more common the atrophy. Simple scopes for meniscus tears do not always lead to atrophy while more involved procedures for ligament reconstruction do.

Related Questions

Feeling pain in my thigh muscle when pressing it or at sitting position. Is it normal after arthroscopic knee surgery for removal of plica? It's day 6

Yes, fairly normal. This is most likely from edema related to the surgery. The edema and injury from the surgery to the area just below your quads can cause significant edema and actual short term structural changes leading to some discomfort. Give it about two weeks and discuss with your ortho if it does not improve. Hope that helps! Read more...
Yes. It is fairly normal to feel thigh discomfort following any type of arthroscopic knee surgery. the thigh muscle shuts down immediately after surgery and can give you that feeling. Physical therapy starts reversing that process. Read more...

I had an arthroscopic knee surgery to remove the plica. When I press my tight muscle, I will feel sharp pain. It has been ongoing since day 1, 11 mar.

See therapist. Could be a number of problems: scar tissue from sugery. Irritation of the tissues in the surgical path, some other structure, tendon or ligament, outside the knee joint. Have a physcial therapist trained in orthopedic physical therapy manual do a through exam. Read more...

What's the quickest way to recover after arthroscopic knee surgery?

Physical therapy. Follow the instruction of your surgeon and those given to your therapist. The surgeon has actually seen the insides of your knee and what is wrong and what was fixed or not fixxed as well as your prognosis. In addition what you can and cannot do and when to progress. Read more...