How painful is bone graft surgery from your hip for dental implants?

Quite Painful . It is quite painful and can cause disturbances in your ability to walk for a while. It's also necessary to stay in the hospital for at least a day following surgery. The good thing is that it is almost never necessary any more. If you would like a referral, i know a brilliant implant surgeon in your city who can help you or at least do a second opinion. His consultations are free for implants!
Controllable pain. It is a big deal to have your hip opened up to harvest bone for dental implants, and the recovery can be uncomfortable and walking stiff. But if it is decided that this is a good option for you, it would not be done lightly and will be of great value. Your surgeon will be able to provide you with medication that will effectively control discomfort. Best wishes.
Moderate. Most of your pain with more than likely be from the donor hip site, unless you are in need of major jaw reconstruction. Then both sites with have moderate pain which should be easily managed with oral pain medications.
Very. Consider an alternative. If it is for the upper jaw, find a specialist who does zygoma implants, thereby eliminating the need for a graft. See a prosthodontist for a thorough evaluation before making any decision. Go to the acop website to find a prosthodontist near you. Good luck.
Very manageable. It is done in a hospital under general anesthesia. It will be more sore where the hip graft is placed in your mouth. All your discomfort can be well controlled with prescription medications.

Related Questions

Is it possible that further bone graft be added during dental implant surgery?

Yes of course. While the best approach for successful implant surgery is to properly evaluate the bone quality and quantity prior to surgery time, (via. Cone beam ct scan), it is quite possible to add more bone to the surgical site at the time of implant placement. Read more...
Bone Graft. There are no contraindications to grafting additional bone at the time of implant placement. In fact, it can be very helpful in some instances. Read more...
Recommended. Bone graft procedures may be performed separately or together when dental implants are being placed. This procedure is done routinely upon the individual's condition.. A bone graft can create a more solid base for the implant integration and stability. Good luck. Read more...
Yes. Absolutely, we do it routinely. For example, when we do the full arch implant surgical / restorative treatment in one day, we keep the bone removed from reshaping the irregular contours and that removed when preparing the implant sites. This is then grafted wherever it is needed. Good Luck. Read more...
Yes. Additional bone grafting is and can be done when implants are placed to help restore contours or to provide bone where the implant may not be completely engaged in bone. Read more...

Is dental implant removal after two years painful with bone graft? Should I opt for anesthesia?

Depends. Depends on location & size. I like to think of this type of procedure more like doing a large filling or crown prep so the level of stimulation is about the same so some patients elect to do sedation above using the normal anesthetic. Anesthetic is the norm though. Read more...
HAH? You kind of mixed a few things together here. Why are you having the implant removed? Are you saying that you will have a bone graft after removal? Unless you enjoy pain I would get an anesthetic. Read more...
Yes Anesthesia. Of course your dentist will administer anesthesia before performing any procedure.. why are you having the implant removed? Has it failed? You need to tell us more of your circumstances before we can offer any advice. Read more...

Do those who undergo dental implant generally need bone graft?

Depends. Sometimes depends on what bone is available at the site to support and surround the implant when placed. Read more...
Sometimes. It depends on the amount and quality of bone a potential implant site has. Sometimes a site has to be augmented in order for an implant to be successful, and sometimes it does not. Read more...
Sometimes. Dental implant surgery and subsequent tooth replacement therapy require both adequate bone and gum tissue. It is not uncommon for an extraction site to be missing both or either--requiring replacement to insure success. Technology has advanced to the point where these tissues can be replaced relatively easily--often with bone from sources other than you the patient. Ask your dentist! Read more...
No. Much depends on the location and reason for the implant. More often the grafting is needed in the upper jaw in the back. When a tooth is lost, the bone can collapse, leaving a defect which needs to be rebuilt to have a good contour and amount of bone to support the implant. Read more...
Not always. Not every implant site needs a bone graft. It all depends on the quality and quantity of the implant site. Read more...
Depends. Depends on the skill of the dentist removing the tooth and how much time lasped between the extraction and getting the dental implant. Read more...
Depends. Not generally, however every situation is different. If your dentist feels extra bone would benefit you then have it done. Read more...
About 40% Do. In my experience, for individuals who have been missing a tooth or teeth for quite some time, there is at least a 40% chance that they will require some type of bone augmentation procedure to reconstruct the bone such that a dental implant can be placed. Even if the tooth is being extracted, a simple socket bone graft should be placed so ensure ideal placement of the future implant. Keep smiling. Read more...

I know bone grafts/augmentations are necessary for many cases of dental implants being applied, but is it the same case for dentures too?

Not Necessarily. Each patient is slightly different. Obviously bone grafting can help preserve the ridge... a good ridge will help support a denture. Read more...
No. In fact, it is not very successful to try augmentation/grafts if dentures are to be worn. The dentures will simple cause resorption of the new bone/graft as it does with the existing bone -- but usually at a more accelerated pace. We tried much of this in the 80's with little success. At your age implants are the best long -term solution. See a Prosthodontist - expert in implants/dentures. G.Luck. Read more...
Bone grafts. There are procedures to try to build up bone before the placement of dentures. However, they are seldom done and prognosis is questionable. That is why it is so important to try to preserve bone and teeth and not require dentures in the first place. The best way to get a good fitting and functioning denture is to be in the hands of a very competent restorative dentist. Read more...

Do I pay $10, 000 for two dental implants when I enter the dentists office or when visit ends? If he cannot place because needs to bone graft, then?

Check with. You have to check with your your own dental surgeon , if additional procedures has to be done , and the total cost to restore your teeth, only your dental surgeon can answer. if you not happy with answer or can not afford see a different provider. Read more...
Financial Policy. Since each office is different and their policies are different, you should discuss the financial aspects of your care with the office manager at the office where you are being treated. Read more...
Depends on the Dr. Every healthcare provider in private practice has his/her own financial policies....just like any other business. Some collect everything up front, some offer payment options (short/long-term), some will do half at the beginning and half at the end, some will collect from insurance first and then bill you the rest, etc. Just ask them. If you need a bone graft, the fee will definitely increase. . Read more...

Which is better to get a tooth extracted and dental implant placed with bone graft same time or extraction/graft wait 3 mos then implant? Success rate

One Surgery. There are no current excellent studies that would indicate a better outcome success rate of one over the other. Generally, if the procedure can be done with one surgery rather than two or more it will preserve more bone structure overall. For this reason alone, i generally prefer one surgery if it is indicated. Read more...
It depends. Immediate placement of implants can be beneficial if the tooth socket provides a lot of bone support for the implant and the implant site is not infected. If additional bone to supplement the support of the implant is available, it will enhance the success rate. If a socket is infected (tooth is abscessed), the extraction site should be allowed to heal prior to implant placement. Read more...
Site dependent. All depends on the site and the available bone and its contour. At our dental implant center we almost always do immediate placement. There are times, however, when it is best to wait for better bone contours and amount. Good luck. Read more...
Wiat. The most predictable and most successful way of performing your procedure is to perform one procedure at a time. In other words extract and bone graft, let it heal then place the dental implant and then let that heal and then restore. Read more...
Tough question. Both are very successful. I consider waiting the 3-4 months in between less risky. There may be reasons to do either. Sometimes immediate implants manage soft tissue better particularly in front teeth. Back teeth on the other hand, i almost always wait for. There is not one answer, if your dr. Is honest with you he/she can review the risks of each in your case. Read more...
Circumstances Vary. It isn't so much which is better, it is which is the best situation for your long term success. Long term statistical studies and my own personal experience shows that when conditions are optimum, there is no difference in the success rate. Talk with your dental professional to see what course of treatment is ideal for you! Read more...
Depends. If the extracted tooth is not infected and the graft is simple, go with 1 surgery. If there is infection, then wait will give you better result (better esthetic and better osseointegration). If criteria fits, success rate is above 95% for both but when you wait, many times you can avoiding bone graft and save money. If there is no infection, the extraction site would fill in with bone nicely. Read more...
Both. Both have good success rates. If you can have all done at once why go through 2 surgeries ? Read more...
Options. Depending on the location of tooth, available bone, and any history of infection at the site, you could potentially do either. Both options can work but one may be better depending on some of those factors. Ask your doctor which method will have the highest chance for success if its your primary concern. This is different than approaching it with the length of treatment time as a driving factor. Read more...
Depends. All drs. Want to have success. Agood dr. Will tell you what is best for your particular situation. Ask them why they choose to do the implant a certain way. After hearing the explanation, if you are not impressed seek a second opinion. Read more...
Immediate implant. There are multiple factors that enter into the decision on whether or not to immediately place an implant. An infection may rule it out as may damaged bone. Some are candidates for immediate placement, but not all. Read more...
Wait. Dental implants are placed at the time of extraction all the time. However, you are taking an increased risk because there are limitations to the placement of the implant. When the tooth is removed, and the bone graft placed, it helps ensure the best possible placement. If you can wait it out, the success rate tends to be better for waiting till the extraction site and bone graft heals. Read more...

Had dental implant 6 days ago. Dr had to add bone graft at the time cuz previous one came out some when he lifted gum. Its been throbbing since. Normal?

Not normal. While I would expect some minor discomfort 6 days after having a dental implant placed, I would not expect throbbing pain. Please return to the dentist who placed the bone graft and implant and have them reevaluate the area for a possible infection. . Read more...

Had a bone graft from cadaver dental implant. Done about a month ago Felt something pull out that looks like a small white worm. Could it be that?

Bone spicule. Yes, it could be a part of the grafted bone, or a piece of your bone that did not attach to the area. We call this a spicule (fragment) and is very common. Think of it as a small splinter working its way to the surface. Usually they feel very sharp to the tongue and much bigger than how small they are when they come out. I removed 2 last week. Not to worry. Good Luck. Read more...
Resorbable Membrane. Allograft (Bone from another Human Being) are powder or pellets. It was most likely Collagen Resorbable Membrane. Read more...