What type doctor specializes in sleep apnea?

Sleep specialist. Sleep specialists that have probably the best ability to treat apnea are pulmonologist (lung doctors) that have gone on to complete a sub-sub specialty in sleep medicine. There is a separate board certification for sleep medicine. To find a specialist that is board certified on your area go to www.Aasmnet.Org (american academy of sleep medicine).
Sleep certified. Look for a physician who is board certified in sleep medicine. Typically a pulmonologist, a neurologist, or an ENT physician.

Related Questions

Which type of doctor specializes in sleep apnea?

Sleep specialists . Sleep medicine is a sub-discipline of medicine. Therapists may include physicians (especially neurologists and pulmonolgists), dentists, physician assistants and lab technicians. Look for training in sleep medicine and membership in sleep academies. Talk to your dentist and pcp for more info. Read more...
Several. Sleep medicine is a subspecility that requires further training. Training can occur after initial training in internal medicine, neurology, pulmonology, otolarynology (ENT) and dentists can make oral devices for treatment. Read more...

What kind of doctor specializes in sleep apnea if you are in a small town far from specialists?

Primary care. Talk to your primary care physician, he will help you find the right resources. Most hospitals have a sleep testing facility and can point you in the right direction. Read more...
A sleep specialist. You may have to drive as sleep physicians are trained to treat these disorders. A family doctor will have knowledge but not specifically about the intricacies. Read more...
Try Pulmonary or ENT. Often you may find a lung specialist or ear-nose-and-throat specialist who can give input and help with making that diagnosis if your family doctor is not comfortable doing so. The condition is very common though, and mot doctors should be able to order the appropriate tests and guide you in treatment. Ent doctors can sometimes perform corrective surgery. Read more...
Talk to your Doctor. You can start by talking with your Primary Care about getting tested for possible Sleep Apnea. Usually a hospital will have the ability to do the testing and can get you set up with a physician for follow-up. Read more...
Some ENTs. or pulmonologists may specialize in this. Your insurance company or PCP may be able to give you guidance on where to go. Read more...

What type of doctor should you see to be tests for sleep apnea?

Your regular Dr. While the specialists in sleep medicine handle really tough cases and read sleep studies your regular dr can order the tests. Read more...
Depends. Most mds can refer you to a sleep center for a sleep test. Very easy to be ordered. Read more...
MD. Start with your regular MD. Some also evaluate/treat sleep patients. Otherwise, he/she will refer. Other docs who specialize in sleep disorders include neurologists, pulmonary specialists and dentists who treat sleep disorders. Read more...

Which type of doctor would you go to for snoring/sleep apnea?

Two. Pulmonologist or neurologist used to be the physicians who were consulted for this disorder. But there are some program now where family physicians recieve additional training in sleep disorders along with general internists. Read more...
Speciallist. A doctor who has a specialty or sub-specialty in sleep apnea therapy. You can contact the american sleep apnea association for a recommendation. Many dentists also treat sleep apnea either by themselves or part of a team so you can ask them as well. Read more...
Sleep apnea. You should start with an ENT or oral ; maxillofacial surgeon who focuses on these treatments. Once diagnosed and evaluated, then they can refer you to a sleep study center. After that you may get the proper treatment based on the severity. Read more...

Can neurotransmitter imbalances be a primary cause of sleep apnea, such that double bi-maxillary advancement will not cure? If so what tests should you have and what type of doctor should I see?

Sleep specialist. Central sleep apnea and other sleep-related breathing disorders should be investigated for. Consultation with a sub-specialty trained specialist in sleep medicine (e.g. Neurologist, pulmonologist, etc.) is recommended. Good luck. (was an oral device such as a mouth guard tried before the double bi-maxillary advancement?). Read more...
Sleep apnea and NT. Sleep apnea can be central (from brain) or obstructive (from oropharynx and blockage of airflow). Only the latter cause is treated by the surgery or procedures to change the anatomy of mouth and throat. A sleep study (polysomnography) and clinical exam of oral structures will sort out. The central causes are related to but not always caused by neurotransmitter issues. Read more...
Sleep apnea. Sleep apnea can be either obstructive or central. Correct diagnosis by a witnessed, overnight sleep study at an accredited center is essential. If obstructive, see an ENT to rule out obstructions ( deviated septum, tonsils, adenoids). If the lower jaw is retruded , causing blockage of the airway, a neuromuscularly determined appliance made by a dentist can avoid the surgery. Read more...

Are there diferent kinds of sleep apnea doctor told me I have two kinds, what does this mean?

Sleep . Sleep apnea can be due to either a physical blockage of your airway (peripheral osa) or due to a central nervous system disorder (central os) where the signal that causes you to take a breath does not get to the muscles that control breathing. Classic osa is typically treated with cpap, surgery, or and oral splint. Without further information i cannot give you a more detailed explaination. Read more...
As . As above discussed above, the 2 main types are central and obstructive. There are many other types of sleep disorders. A sleep specialist can help with the diagnosis which may an overnight sleep study. Occasionally these can be done at home with special equipment, . Read more...
Its . Its possible he was referring to a mixed form that includes components of both peripheral obstructive and central sleep apnea. This information would be noted on your polysomnogram ( sleep study). Read more...