If one sibling has a congenital heart defect, should all siblings get a heart echo?

Not necessarily. This depends on the nature of the heart defect. Some are picked up because there is a murmur that is significant. Usually siblings do not need an echo just because one does. If there is a genetic predisposition like in idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis then the siblings might all need to be checked out. That is easily determined by your physician and cardiologist.
It depends . The answer depends on the likelihood of a genetic influence, and the likelihood of being able to diagnose with physical examination. Some congenital heart defects, such as bicuspid aortic valve, are more likely to have a genetic influence and may be difficult to diagnose by examination. Others, such as a vsd, have low likelihood of genetic influence and high accuracy with diagnosis by exam.
No. Have them seen by their pediatrician who might want to obtain an ecg, but if the medical history is unremarkable, the child has no symptoms and is growing well, the physical exam is normal and the ECG shows no problem there is usually no need for an echo.

Related Questions

Is it safe for me to get my penis circumsied? I'm a 20 year old male and I was born with a congenital heart defect.

It . It depends upon the type of heart defect you have, how severe it is, and what kind of anesthesia is required for your circumcision. If you decide to have the procedure, you can discuss your concerns with the anesthesiologist who will be providing anesthesia or with the surgeon who will be preforming the circumcision. Good luck! Read more...
See PCP/Urologist. Your primary care and your urologist will be better able to address this question for you as they would know your medical history and can examine you. Generally, minor congenital heart defects are not a concern. Also the procedure may be done under local anesthetic rather than a general anesthetic. Read more...

Could congenital heart defects (one or more) be diagnosed later on in life?

Yes. Most congenital heart defects are diagnosed early in life. However, for many reasons, in some patients, a congenital heart defect may not be diagnosed until adulthood. Read more...

Please tell me, could congenital heart defects (one or more) be diagnosed later on in life?

Variable . Some congenital heart defects almost always present in the first few hours of life. Others, have a variable presentation and may present at any age. The most common standard congenital heart disease to present in adulthood is atrial septal defect. Bicuspid aortic valve also often presents in adulthood, and although it is a congenital anomaly, is not always included in the classification. Read more...

Is it possible for congenital heart defects (one or more) to be diagnosed later on in life?

Depends. This depends on the defect. Some can hide and some do not.It is common for someone to go a whole lifetime with a minor issue like a patent foramen ovale (some don't consider it a defect).Some issues like a trivial leaking mitral valve are only evident because of advanced technology (echocardiogram).Other issues like a misdirected plumbing or holes between chambers are found in childhood. Read more...

Need help for congenital heart defect for 21 month child? Where do we start to get information.

See your. Pediatrician who may refer you to a pediatric cardiologist (heart specialist). Read more...
Peds cardiologist . Your child needs a pediatric cardiologist. Your child's pediatrician would be a good resource to find one as would the nearest children's hospital. Read more...

Can people with? Congenital heart defects? Get tattoos?

Depends on condition. The healing process after a tattoo may be a bit long & complicated if you have a complex chd with a low baseliine oxygen saturation (<92%). If your chd has been repaired or fixed well enough that you have a normal baselone o2, >94% , i don't see any problems. Read more...

What is considered the number one way or treatment for congenital heart defects or "hole in heart"?

Depends. Depends on the defect, but in most if not all, it would require a surgical intervention to patch it. The urgency depends on the type of defect, age and overall condition at the time of diagnosis. Read more...
It depends. About 1% of all children have some form of congenital heart disease, many of which are "holes" or defects between chambers. Most of these are very minor and require no treatment. Many close by themselves over time. A small fraction of the larger defects require repair, which can require open heart surgery or (more and more often) closure using a catheter (tube) inserted through a blood vessel. Read more...
Ped.Cardiologist. Need to undergo a complete evaluation by a pediatric cardiologist to determine the specific nature of the congenital heart defect. Only then a rational specific recomendation can be advised. It is not just a "hole in the heart", it is not that simple. There are many possible "holes in the heart" and associated additional abnormalities that are to taken into consideration for recomendation. Read more...

Can you explain which congenital heart defects produce mixing of oxygenated and unoxygenated blood and which ones increase ven?

It's complicated. The right side of the heart pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs; the left side pumps oxygenated blood to the body. Certain heart defects are characterized by holes between the left and right sides of the heart or between the lung arteries and the body's artery, allowing deoxygenated blood to flow from r->l (causing cyanosis) or oxygenated blood to flow from l->r (causing heart failure). Read more...

How should we care for our baby who was born with a congenital heart defect?

Depends on deformity. Some congenital cardiac deformities are minor, others are quite serious. Your pediatrician and pediatric cardiologist will be working with you to teach you to provide the best care for your baby. Never be afraid to call with questions. No newborn parent's question is ever trivial. Read more...
Depends on defect. Some, like the VSD can close on their own in the first year & need nothing more than monitoring by your pediatrician.Some are life threatening immediately after delivery and require immediate transfer to a tertiary hospital for surgery.Find out from your treatment team. Take notes often and keep contact numbers for treating physicians available at all times along with a list of any medications. Read more...