Why are antibiotics prescribed for rosacea? Is it a bacterial infection?

No. The antibiotics decrease bacteria which be a factor but are used more as antiinflammator drugs to decrease inflammation. The drugs decrease activity of white blood cells which are overactive in rosacea.
Can be. Although rosacea is not an infection per se, one of the complications of having it is a form of acne. That form of acne usually responds well to metronidazole. This won't cure rosacea, but it can help decrease the inflammation and superficial skin infections. I don't like oral antibiotics for rosacea and try to limit their use to topical products.

Related Questions

I had prostatitis (bacterial infection). I took full antibiotic course. I want to know how does prostatitis recur? And what I need to do to stop it?

Difficult to treat. Prostatitis is difficult to treat as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks of antibiotics to clear. As a 27 year old it is not a common issue either. It is typically bacterial infection. YOu may have a swollen prostate from something else too, like prolonged sitting or bike riding. Read more...
Yes. often recurs. Sometimes it depends on your anatomy and you cannot prevent it. Also difficult to treat, need the right antibiotic for the right amount of time or it will seem like a new infection in fact may be the same one again. Prevention: single partner, increase fluids, address issues of prostate enlargement if they occur. Notify your doctor if any changes to your urinary stream. Read more...

Can a bacterial infection require a specific antibiotic to wipe it out?

Yes. Bacterial infections usually require antibiotic treatment with a drug to which the bacteria is susceptible. Some antibiotics will work for some bacteria but not others. Most bacteria are sensitive to a number of different antibiotics. Microbiology labs do sensitivity testing to inform the doctor as to which antibiotics will be effective. Read more...

What should you do if you have bacterial infection all over the body? Antibiotic won't help

Peculiar diagnosis. Hmmm.... I don't mean to sound undiplomatic, but a "bacterial infection all over the body", not helped by antibiotics, sounds screwy. If self diagnosed, see a doctor for professional evaluation. If it has been medically diagnosed, discuss further with the doctor, and perhaps ask for referral to an infectious diseases specialist, or dermatologist if it involves primarily the skin. Good luck! Read more...