Sleep apnea surgery results?

Depends. Outcomes depend on the procedure/combination of procedures, as well as the anatomy of the airway. Soft tissue surgery (on the palate, nose, etc) have roughly a 50-70% success rate. Jaw surgery, although a bit more drastic, has approximately a 90-95% success rate. Best to see a surgeon in your area trained in sleep surgery to discuss this at length and choose the right procedure for you.
Not great. Results vary. In appropriately selected patients the surgery can be very successful, 70-80%. Also it depends on what surgery is being talked about mma (often multiple steps) has been reported in some studies to have over 90% success. Other surgeries like uppp in a severe apnea patient may be < 10% success.
Variable. Variable depending on circumstances. Best bet is to have complete evaluation by sleep MD and discuss options.

Related Questions

Is sleep apnea surgery effective?

Sleep apnea. Some surgeries are more effective than others. Te most important part is the diagnosis to see where the problem is. Jaw advancement is shown to have great results. This surgery opens up the posterior airway. Read more...
It can be. Especially if you have nasal obstructions or large tonsils or adenoids. Having an open nasal airway is very important to proper breathing. Soft palate surgery is also done, but has more varied effectiveness. Each individual patient needs their own diagnosis. Read more...
It can be. Sleep apnea has two forms...'obstructive' and 'central'. The obstructive type has to do with tissues blocking the airway during sleep. Surgical reduction of these tissues can be beneficial. Don't use surgery as a primary therapy...Try non-surgical approaches first. Read more...
Sleep. Usually sleep apnea surgery involves multiple steps or procedures. The efficacy rate is less than 40% and complication rate is high. Read more...
Last resort. Whatever type of surgery, I would exhaust all other options first to see if your sleep apnea can be managed. CPAP and mouthpieces are viable options normally, but correcting a deviated septum or surgery in the throat area do help under certain circumstances. Health style changes also help- loss of weight, etc. Read more...
Often. Often very effective. Usually reserved for CPAP failures or intolerance. Sleep MD can discuss this in your case. Read more...

What is the new sleep apnea surgery?

Soft Tissue +/- Bone. Lasers or radio waves can be used to trim back excessive soft tissue. The upper and/or lower jaws can be brought forward which opens the airway. Read more...
Various surgeries. Surgeries for sleep apnea depends on where the obstruction in the airway is present. Surgeries can include, lower and upper jaw advancement, tongue suspension, hyoid bone suspension, removal of the tonsils and adenoids, nasal surgery and removal of the excess tissue in the back of the throat. Read more...
New apnea surgery. Laser-assisted uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (LAUP) or upper airway reconstruction. It is recommended only when other treatment options are unsuccessful in eliminating the symptoms of sleep apnea. Read more...
A few. There are a number of new sleep apnea surgeries. Work with your sleep MD to explore the options. Read more...

Are there any new sleep apnea surgery?

Best Outcomes. The most effective treatment ever noted for obstructive sleep apnea is a bimaxillary jaw advancement. If the sleep apnea is related to a narrow airway behind the palate and behind the tongue, this surgery is the final solution with almost 100% positive outcomes. It is not a minor surgery, like uppp or tongue ablation. Read more...
Down the road. There are some interesting new surgical treatments for sleep apnea which are not yet fda approved. Keep your eyes and ears open in next year or two. Read more...
LAUP. Laser-assisted uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (LAUP) or upper airway reconstruction. It is recommended only when other treatment options are unsuccessful in eliminating the symptoms of sleep apnea. Read more...
Yes. Most of the new procedures involve advancing the upper and lower jaw to open the airway. This procedure is done by oral & maxillofacial surgeons. Read more...

What is involved in sleep apnea surgery?

Several types. There are several types of surgery for treatment of sleep apnea. All involve either removing, or re-positoning structures to improve your airflow. Be sure that you have considered other alternatives as well. CPAP from your md, or an oral appliances from your dentist, are non-surgical options to be considered. Read more...
It depends. On the type of surgery. There are a number of different procedures used to treat sleep apnea. The specific procedure needs to be tailored to the patient and their obstructive pattern. The basic idea behind any osa surgery is to relieve the obstruction. Read more...
It varies. . Sometimes, it is as simple as removing tonsils, other procedures may involve palate surgery or jaw surgery. Read more...
Many types. Many types of OSA surgery exist. Best explanation here: http://www.sleepapnea.org/treat/treatment-options/surgery.html. Read more...

What do you know about sleep apnea surgery?

Nothing. Because I do not think that it is the right treatment. Sleep apnea is associated with throat constriction but it is really a compromise of oxidation (oxygen use) in brainstem. In many cases it is due to deficiency of thiamine and/or magnesium affecting the oxidation process. Since sugar ovewhelms the oxidation mechanism it is often the villain in the process. Read more...
Patient selection. Surgery for obstructive sleep apnea (osa) is all about patient selection and patience. Osa is due to airway collapse and ents have various medical (including cpap) and surgical treatments to treat this collapse. When my patients fail medical therapy or need help tolerating cpap, surgery might be the answer. It takes a tailored approach for each patient for a reasonable outcome. Read more...

Should I risk obstructive sleep apnea surgery?

Depends. Get a comprehensive consult from a sleep physician rather than a surgeon. There are several options for treatment of sleep apnea ranging from weight loss, cpap, dental devices and surgery; do not rush into an aggressive option without a second opinion. Read more...
Probably. I'm guessing you have been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea, and the question is whether the surgery is worth it. Those with obstructive sleep apnea have a higher rate of heart disease and heart failure, weight gain, decreased energy, and a host of other issues. The surgery itself is usually a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy, well known and low risk procedures, but not totally innocent. Read more...
Maybe. If you have really tried the nonsurgical options (ie cpap) then sleep apnea surgery can be appropriate and effective. The risk of the surgery itself depends on the exact procedure, skill of the surgeon, and your underlying health status. Read more...
Depends on severity. The ideal situation would be that surgery could fix all sleep apnea patients so they would not have to wear a machine or dental device. The reality is that while surgery works well for mild and even moderate sleep apnea, success is best achieved with a surgeon who has a lot of experience in this type of surgery. If you can't or won't wear a machine at night, surgery is surely worth the risk. Read more...
Last resort. If you've been properly diagnosed, what other solutions have you tried? There is CPAP of various types and mandibular advancement appliances, made by dentists. These approaches can be very effective, alone or in combination. Surgery is highly invasive, painful and not always successful. In addition, there is often surgical relapse, and you return to pre surgical condition. Last resort for me. Read more...
Which surgery?? "bimaxillary advancement, " that is, surgically moving the jaws (with the teeth and tongue attached) forward so that the base of the tongue is moved away from the throat tissues in the back--opening the airway, is a reasonably successful surgery--but risky! fortunately, there are other, safer methods. The CPAP is an "air" splint and dental devices are mechanical splints for use while sleeping. Read more...
Depends. Most sleep apnea surgery techniques are safe. Indications for surgery include intolerance of CPAP and oral appliances and a corrective anatomical problem. Discuss in detail with your sleep MD. Read more...

What are the options for sleep apnea surgery?

Sleep Apnea Surgery. Go take a look at my website: http://www.Twinlakesent.Com/snoring. A detailed explanation of treatment options for helping to relieve airway obstruction. Generally, surgery helps treat sleep apnea, but does not cure sleep apnea. Weight loss is generally the best way to "cure" sleep apnea. Nasal surgery is my first choice, then again trying CPAP / bipap. Read more...
Multiple. There are multiple options depending on the severity and requires a further evaluation as well as a sleep study and a ct of your head and neck for evalution. Read more...
Sleep Apnea Surgery. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is a disease that can affect different levels of the airway and also varies in its severity. There are many treatments, all with varying success rates and rates of relapse. However, for SEVERE sleep apnea (as demonstrated by your sleep study and your comorbidities) MMA surgery has been shown to be highly effective; it is evidence-based and upheld by solid clinical data. Read more...
Apnea and surgery. There are many surgical options for the treatment of sleep apnea for patients who can not tolerate CPAP therapy. Surgery for OSA is a last resort and is usually not done unless other treatments have failed. Studies suggest that success rates for sleep apnea surgery are rarely higher than 65% and often deteriorate with time. If CPAP intolerant, see a dentist for advanced mandibular oral appliance. Read more...
Same principle. All OSA surgical options have same method of success: opening up areas of airway.obstruction. Options range from simple intranasal surgery and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty to advancing upper and lower jaw. Get multiple opinions before embarking on this surgery. Try non-surgical modalities first. Read more...

How tall can you grow after you get a sleep apnea surgery?

No effect. There is no effect in height after sleep apnea surgery. It is very rare for someone to have sleep apnea surgery prior to full growth anyway. The only exceptions may be kids with severe craniofacial abnormalities. Even then there is no effect on height. Read more...
???????????? In all my years of doing sleep dentistry i was never asked that question. From all of what i know there is no correlation between the 2. If someone in this forum has some literature on this i would love to read it. Ecomom6 i feel it's safe to say none. Read more...
Unknown. No data I know of. But, it would make sense a child with OSA will have health and growth impacted. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: sleep apnea surgery?

Multilevel Surgery. Sleep apnea surgery attempts to address the sites of obstruction that occur during sleep apnea, mainly the palate and tongue. Many surgeons address the nose surgically, however research does not support it for reducing sleep apnea, and it is often performed with purpose of allowing better compliance with CPAP therapy. There are many techniques with varied levels of success with each. Read more...
Palate surgery. Sleep apnea occurs when the soft palate falls back blocking off the airway when you sleep. Eventually you wake up and breathe again. But you never get good sleep and there are long term issues too. Surgeries that try to address this are called sleep apnea surgery. Typically the soft palate (too part in back of mouth) is altered so it won't fall back into the airway. Read more...
Many. The are many surgical treatments available for treating obstructive sleep apnea, beyond what can be described in this format. Many are specific to the type and level of the causes for osa, seek an experienced practioner who can adequated discuss the benefits and risks for each type for a particular condition along with all alternatives. Read more...
Airway opening. Sleep apnea can be caused by a blocked airway. An oral appliance, with or without CPAP (a machine that blows air into the airway), can be helpful in opening the airway. Some people recommend surgery to remove tissues that may be blocking the airway (tonsils, throat wall, soft palate, etc.). Do the reversible things (oral airway, cpap) first, though. Read more...
Removing tissue. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when air is obstructed while sleeping. One alternative is to have a surgical solution to remove the tissue in question. Read more...