Symptoms of gum disease that indicate early stages of periodontal disease?

Dental exam. Bleeding when you floss, swelling or redness. You may notice a fetid odor or loosening teeth; but the only sure diagnosis is from a periodontal exam and x-rays with your dentist.

Related Questions

Can gum disease be the early stages of periodontal disease?

It is. That is exactly how periodontal disease starts....With gingivitis (gum disease) but with proper cleaning and oral hygiene it is preventable. See your dentist for care. Read more...
It's the same. It begins as gingivitis. If that is left untreated it can turn into early gum disease or periodontal disease and then advance from there. Read more...

Is gum disease the same as periodontal disease?

Not exactly. Gum disease or gingivitis is the precursor to periodontal disease. Untreated/uncontrolled gingivitis can progress into more inflammation and then bone loss/recession which is periodontal disease. They are directly related but not the same. See your dentist for more info. Read more...
Yes ... Technically speaking..Periodontal disease includes gum disease. You can have gingivitis but have no bone loss. However, the use of gum disease implies both the gums and bone are diseased. Read more...
Classifications. In the classification of periodontal diseases the most common one is gingivitis. It only affects the gums. Periodontitis affects the gum and bone. Generally we refer to all types of periodontal disease as gum disease, even if that is not technically correct. Read more...

Is lanap used to treat gum disease periodontal disease?

Gum disease. Laser assisted new attachment procedure is considered the state of the art for treating periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is caused by bacteria on the roots of the teeth. In the past, treatment consisted of cutting the gums away which caused increased sensitivity and cosmetic issues. Using a laser to correct these problems is much less invasive and therefore more comfortable. Read more...
Yes LNAP is. Used to treat gum disease, typically of the advanced variety of 5-9 mm periodontal pockets in our practice. We see phenomenal results. Read more...
Mild/moderate . Yes lanap is used to treat mild to moderate gingivitis and some early periodontitis .. And it's usually very effective. Read more...
Yes. It has been around for years. Recently it has gained in popularity. If done correctly it is very effective. Read more...

Will gum disease develop into periodontal disease if people don't look after their teeth?

Gum Disease. Absolutely. Good home care reduces the bacteria and inflammation leading to bone loss and then loss of teeth. Read more...
Yes. Gum disease or gingivitis is periodontal disease. It is the early stage of it and if not treated properly will advance into a more advanced problem called periodontitis which affects the bone as well as the gums. Read more...
One is worse. Gingivitis is the beginning stages, and by definition, your gums are inflamed, and you might see them bleed when you brush and floss. If this is left untreated, then the infection moves deeper into the jaw, and it progresses to the more severe, periodontal disease. Read more...

Does gum disease always develop into periodontal disease if people don't look after their teeth?

Likely. Gum disease...Infection in the gum that surrounds teeth. Unattended infection can spread to the teeth and cause periodontal disease. Eating healthy foods (non gmo, organic, more fresh foods, variety of foods, less processed and "comfort foods") will help the immune system. Flossing is crucial! if you have gum disease see someone and get it taken care of before it progresses. Read more...
Always... Gum disease is a common name for periodontal disease. It is chronic disease, like diabetes , arthritis, high blood pressure etc.. Once you get it- it is forever...Early signs may be gums bleeding, bad breath, later you may get teeth moving and, if neglected- you may loose teeth. Periodontal disease is caused by bacteria, there is some genetic predisposition also. So, my advise is: do not wait ..! Read more...

Wanted to know if I can trust my new dentist who says I need gum treat due to signs of pre-gingivitis or pre-periodontal disease?

Pre Perio disease. If your gums bleed during brushing, or during professional cleaning, that hurst, bad breath, have perio pockets like 3mm or more all over your mouth or you do not have your teeth clean on a regular bases you probably need deep perio cleaning. Read more...

Men with periodontal disease had 64 percent higher risk of pancreatic cancer? Should I be worried. I have moderate gum disease. Finally got dental ins

Statistical Relation. From my understanding, no cause and effect relationship. Other factors to consider. I think at this stage you should be more worried about losing your teeth and wearing dentures. http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/gum-disease/article/ada-01-periodontal-disease. Read more...
Fortunately. pancreatic cancer is less common than cancers of lung, colon, prostate, blood. So 64% more of a small risk is still a risk smaller than any of the other cancers or more common cause of death such as heart disease. You should have your teeth/gums treated, but this treatment would probably not affect your risk of death in any meaningful manner. Read more...
Periodontal Disease. Good day; I would be concerned more about eliminating periodontal disease and maintaining a inflammatory free dentition than an increased susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer. Meticulous home care, firm keratinized gingival tissue and frequent prophylaxis visits will minimize cancer susceptibility. Read more...
Be aware. Knowing that some of the pathogens in gum disease are associated with but not necessarily causal for pancreatic cancer really gives you one logical option: Manintain your periodontal health so you have a normal flora or bacterial ecosystem so you have one less thing to worry about! The fewer things you have that are associated with significant disease, the better! Read more...
Risk. Risk of damage from gum infection more significant than slightly elevated risk of pancreatic cancer. See a Periodontist, a gum/bone specialist, to treat your infection, thus reducing cancer risk. Read more...
See below. Have your dentist take care of your periodontal issues and refer you to a periodontist if needed. Read more...
Risk factors. You have other risk factors that would be more indicative of cancer risk. Alcohol and smoking are significant risk factors for oral cancer so a screening visit is indicated. The correlation with pancreatic cancer is not indicative of causation. Get an exam, screening and treatment for your periodontal issues, for your health in general. Read more...
Peridontal disease. The good news is that periodontal disease can be treated. Get to a dentist and get your mouth healthy. Also work n your diet, weight, smoking and the other unhealthy areas in your life. Read more...
Periodontal Health. We should all try to improve our health as best we can on a daily basis. Therefore go for routine dental and medical check-ups and listen to your dentist and physician's recommendations. There have been shown higher health risks in general for individuals with poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease. While present they are not major risks. Especially at your age I would not worry. Read more...
See your dentist. Having periodontal disease puts you at risk for other health problems as well. Good thing is, it is treatable.
See you dentist to help you manage your periodontal disease. Read more...
Other factors. are also at play, but definitely get your gum disease properly treated asap and maintain regular visits to keep it at bay. Read more...
Cause and effect? There are a lot of bad studies out there. Just because there's a statistical relationshp doesn't prove a thing, especially that managing the gum disease will decrease your risk. You should do this for your own sake. I suspect that both are related to tobacco use, which causes both. Read more...

Will a dental hygienist know if you have gingivitis or periodontal disease?

I agree with others. hygienist have enough information to know about gingivityis but they will confirm with doctor about problem normally gum around the teeth is red and some case blides with brushing but bliding and inflammation aroynd the gum can be periodontal problem. Read more...
Only by probing. the only way to know if you have periodontal disease is to measure the space between the gum and the tooth (by probing). You can also diagnose it off x rays, but by the time it shows up on an x ray, it is too late to do anything about it. Read more...
They might. Ultimately, the diagnosis and treatment will be the dentist's responsibility. Read more...

What are some ways to prevent cavities, gingivitis and periodontal disease besides brushing?

Prevention. Chewing sugar free gum is very efective(esp. Gum with xylitol)reduction of sugar, softdrinks etc also helps. Read more...
Nutrition. Along with brushing, flossing, and rinsing, it is important to have great nutrition. Please cut down on sugary snacks, and eat lots of fruits, and vegetables! Read more...
Flossing and... It is vital to floss, to do it well and regularly. Additionally, keep up with your recommended hygienist appointment intervals, and try to stay in overall good systemic health. Do not be reticent about discussing your personal risk factors and asking about re-reviewing oral hygiene skills with your dentist. Prevention is just as important (if not more) than rehabilitation. Read more...
No magic bullet. Preventing cavities can be accomplished by reducing sugar intake, especially sticky sugars like raisins, dried fruit, caramels, etc. Gingivitis and periodontal disease can be reduced by brushing, flossing and using oral rinses. there is no magic bullet: you have to work at it to stop its progression. Read more...