Bone infection from surgery for compound fracture. Why?

MSSA. Most likely a staph, perhaps mssa or MRSA depending on the community.
Varies. Possible causes: bone was infected prior to fracture. Bone became infected after fracture and before surgery. Infection occurred during or after surgery. An infectious diseases specialist can help to sort this out.
Open fracture. A compound or open fracture means that the bone broke through the skin and therefore the fracture is now exposed to bacteria on the skin and from the environment. This makes open fractures more prone to infection than closed fractures.

Related Questions

How likely is a bone infection after a fracture?

Not likely. Almost unheard of unless the bone was sticking thru the skin or the fracture required surgery to stabilize. If the skin was intact, but the fracture requires surgery then generally speaking the infection rate is no higher than 1%. Some complicating medical problems can increase this risk, such as diabetes and smoking. Read more...
Depends. Open fractures (where skin is broken) can definitely get infected and may need immediate fix and antibiotics. Closed fractures can still get infected, but is less likely. Tetanus shot good idea if not within 5 years. Also depends on site of injury and mechanism. Read more...

How common is a bone infection or fracture site infection with closed bone fractures?

Not common. If the fracture is truly closed, bacteria should not be able to infect the bone since it isn't exposed to the outside environment. Fractures, where bone is penetrated through the skin or visible through a wound, have variable infection rates based on the size of the wound and the time until the patient receives antibiotics. Read more...

Why would one get an infection in an elbow a month after surgery there? Also has RA and many broken bones.

Immunosupression ? Many medications that are used to treat rheumatoid arthritis can also suppress the immune system. That increases risk of infection or decreased wound healing. Prednisone can cause these side effects and it also can cause or worsen osteoporosis and lead to increased risk of fractures. Read more...
Not due to surgery? Uncertain if the infection was from the surgery. It may have been from another source. We know if you have rheumatoid arthritis you are at a greater risk of infection independently. It depends on the medications also. If there are broken bones we know people with RA have a great risk to develop osteoporosis which is related to an increased risk of fracture. Read more...

How might aspergillus turn up in the molecular analysis of a bone biopsy? A bone infection was evident in an X-ray and MRI following surgery to straighten a hammer-toe. The biopsy didn't grow so they sent the sample to the university for a molecular analy

This . This is a loaded question. To get to the root of any infection, there often needs to be an "outbreak" where several cases can be tracked to a common cause. In individual cases, this can be much more difficult because there are so many variables. Aspergillus is a mold that is common in the environment. One source notes specifically the northern hemisphere in fall and winter. When something is in a lot of places, it is difficult to determine which source caused the infection. For surgical wound infections, there is a complex interplay between the environment, the patient's immune system, and the wound. For an infection to be established, you have to have adequate numbers of pathogens (infection-causing organisms). They then have to overwhelm the immune system or be protected from it. Often hammertoe correction will involve some form of hardware. Regardless of where the aspergillus came from, once it is on the hardware (either before or after insertion), it will create a layer, called biofilm, which protects it from the immune system. Any poor circulation related to the wound will further limit access to the immune system. Another possibility is that the aspergillus is a contaminant that is not causing the infection. Sometimes, we just don't know what the cause is. Read more...
Many possibilitis. Could have been a true infection, a false positive due to a superficial contaminant, or possibly even a lab error. Read more...
Aspergillus. As stated this is a mold that has a problem living in an anaerobic state. I am inclined to lean toward lab error as well. Read more...
Contaminant. It is most likely a contaminant. The pcr assay is so sensitive and even a spore picked up in the air or from contact would show up. Read more...
Osteomyelitis. Usually a bone culture as well a bone biopsy is performed for a bone infection. Anything is possible as far a bacterial infections did your foot look clinically infected ie cellulitis and drainage? Read more...

How is a compound fracture typically stabilized after surgery?

Many ways. It depends on the severity of the fracture (fracture pattern and location) and severity of the soft tissue injury. Some open fractures can be treated with a "wash-out" and immediate internal fixation to stabilize the fracture. Others may require an external fixator for stabilization. The classification of the soft-tissue injury is factor in determining the type of stabilization. Read more...
Stabilized fracture. "compound" has been replaced with the word "open". Depending upon the bone location, severity, and grade of the open fracture, may be splint, plate, screws, external fixator. Read more...

What is the post-surgery treatment for a compound fracture of the tibia?

Casting and therapy. Compound fracture of your tibia requiring surgery likely means you had teel rod/plates and screws to stabilize the tibia. After surgery, you may need casting, possible a removable cast. Non-weight-bearing (no walking on that leg) for several weeks, then partial wt bearing etc..Physically therapy is almost always recommended during this process. Ask questions and follow doc's advice. Good luck. Read more...

Can you tell me how is a compound fracture stabilized after surgery?

Fractures. can be treated in a number of ways including placing a rod in the marrow or canal of the bones. Metal plates and screws can also be used to hold the bones in place. occasionally we can also use external fixators whereby pins are placed in the bones and stick out of the skin and are held together by rods. Read more...