11 doctors weighed in:
Being depressed seems so common. Is there any evolutionary reason people get depressed when bad things happen?
11 doctors weighed in

Dr. Robert Thilo
Psychiatry
7 doctors agree
In brief: Yes, likely.
The multifactorial nature of attributes that lead to the diagnosis of depression may point to certain neuro-processes that lead to adaption and survival.
Simplistically, conflict (bad stuff) resolution requires analysis in isolation in the face of unpleasant (painful) emotions. Excessive rumination is one of the hallmarks of depression.

In brief: Yes, likely.
The multifactorial nature of attributes that lead to the diagnosis of depression may point to certain neuro-processes that lead to adaption and survival.
Simplistically, conflict (bad stuff) resolution requires analysis in isolation in the face of unpleasant (painful) emotions. Excessive rumination is one of the hallmarks of depression.
Dr. Robert Thilo
Dr. Robert Thilo
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1 comment
Dr. Bennett Werner
What a thoughtful answer! Bravo!
Dr. John Moranville
Psychiatry
5 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
The development of the frontal lobes of the brain which are the basis for thought and the limbic system or emotional part of the brain create a mechanism for feeling which as far as we know is unique to humans.
We naturally feel good about good things and bad about bad things. Feeling bad or being disappointed, however, do not always lead to depression.

In brief: Yes
The development of the frontal lobes of the brain which are the basis for thought and the limbic system or emotional part of the brain create a mechanism for feeling which as far as we know is unique to humans.
We naturally feel good about good things and bad about bad things. Feeling bad or being disappointed, however, do not always lead to depression.
Dr. John Moranville
Dr. John Moranville
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1 comment
Dr. Neil Liebowitz
Evolution favored an emotional system which aids attachment, cooperation and salience. It also motivate action and avoidance of harm. We remember best things with strong emotional reactions, good and bad. Feeling down may illicit empathy in others, but severe depression is clearly a failure of a complex brain system and has no more adaptive value than diabetes or heart disease. see my book
Dr. Kevin Passer
Pediatrics - Psychiatry
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Probably
One might just take a guess that cavemen, in times, for example, of great disasters and conflicts could have become depressed, so, they would stay in and support each other, whereas the not depressed group might journey out and get killed.

In brief: Probably
One might just take a guess that cavemen, in times, for example, of great disasters and conflicts could have become depressed, so, they would stay in and support each other, whereas the not depressed group might journey out and get killed.
Dr. Kevin Passer
Dr. Kevin Passer
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1 comment
Dr. Quang Nguyen
Interesting thoughts...
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