Who treats spinal stenosis?

Pain physicians also. In addition to dr. Frankel's answer, also consider talking to an interventional pain/spine physician. They have other minimally invasive options to treat spinal stenosis, such as the mild procedure.
PT,PainMD,SpineSurge. Treatment of Spinal Stenosis consists of Physical Therapy,Pain Management and Spine Surgery.Depending on the severity of the condition 1Physical Therapist 2Pain Management includes Pain Meds and Epidural Injections 3Spine Surgeone in those severe cases not respnding to PT and Pain Management.
Spine surgeon. Whether or not you need surgery, an experienced neurosurgeon or orthopedic spine surgeon is the best resource to educate you in the treatment options available.
Primary care. Initially, usually primary care and chiropractors. If it worsens, then orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, and interventional pain doctors can get involved.

Related Questions

Does lsi treat spinal stenosis?

Not really. I assume by lsi, you are referring to lumbar spinal injections, also known as epidural steroid injections (esis). These can help temporarily treat some of the pain associated with spinal stenosis but are not a definitive treatment. Check out http://www.Mildprocedure.Com for some information on a new minimally invasive procedure for spinal stenosis. Read more...
If you mean epidural. If you mean epidural spinal injections, these can work for about 50% of people long term & can be repeated as needed as long as they give good relief for many months or a year or more. Mention of a mild procedure was noted which probably is less effective than injections but there is little data supporting the latter procedure to even evaluate it & it is not marketed to spine surgeons as a rule. Read more...
Common option. LESIs are commonly used for conservative treatment of symptomatic spinal stenosis. Check out Spine-health.com. Read more...

What are the best ways to treat spinal stenosis?

Spinal Stenosis Tx. Spinal stenosis (ss) is a difficult problem to treat. Because the disease is progressive, the treatment varies depending on the severity of the condition. Early on, simple lifestyle modifications such us leaning on a cane suffice. Later, epidural steroids can be helpful. For severe cases, there is a new procedure called minimally invasive spinal decompression (mild) that has shown promise. Read more...
Depends. Spinal stenosis can be diagnosed on an MRI or ct. It involves compression of nerves and at times spinal cord. A physical exam can clarify this situation. The spinal stenosis may be serious enough to warrant surgery. This is especially important in the neck area as it could lead to paraparesis. A neurologist can help figuring out the appropriate steps of treatment. Read more...
Ones that have a . By using proven treatments in a guided fashion based on the degree of symptoms & findings keeping in mind underlying medical issues that may affect the providing of the care or its tolerance including activity modification/exercise/physical therapy, medication, a 0 degree lordosis back support, a reversed soft cervical collar, use of a cane/ walker, epidural steroid injections & finally surgery. Read more...
Common problem. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common problem especially for those older than 50. It can be managed conservatively in many patients for years. If surgery becomes necessary, it can be planned on an elective basis. Check out spine-health.Com. Read more...
Tx spinal stenosis. The treatment of spinal stenosis is usually surgical. Physical therapy and spinal injections may help the pains, but the only thing that would help the actual extra tissue growth within the spinal column would be surgery. The area of involvement would need to be defined by MRI scanning. Read more...

How should I treat back spinal stenosis?

Physical therapy. Physical therapy and pain medications (as needed) are appropriate first line. Spinal stenosis due to degenerative changes is relatively slowly progressive. If necessary, decompression laminectomy can be performed; but it is better to wait till it is truly necessary. Read more...
Decompression. Spinal stenosis only matters if it is severe enough to compress the spinal cord or nerve roots. If there is no spinal cord or nerve root compression, then the stenosis is irrelevant. There are open and minimally invasive ways to decompress the spinal canal. Be sure to go to someone like me who is trained and experienced in every spinal procedure for stenosis, not just a subset of them. Read more...
Begin with injection. Injection decompression surgery can ease your suffering start with simple things surgery predictably relieves leg pain with standing and walking with no change in back discomfort. Read more...
Common problem. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common problem especially for those older than 50. It can be managed conservatively in many patients for years. If surgery becomes necessary, it can be planned on an elective basis. Check out spine-health.Com. Read more...
Physical therapy. One very good start to treatment is physical therapy, particularly, aqua therapy -- done in the water. This alleviates the pressure on the back and joints and will help the therapist be able to help you with strengthening your core muscles and improving flexibility, both of which will help decrease pain. Read more...

What are different ways to treat back spinal stenosis?

Physical Therapy. Physical therapy and pain medications (as needed) are appropriate first line. Spinal stenosis due to degenerative changes is relatively slowly progressive. If necessary, decompression laminectomy can be performed; but it is better to wait till it is truly necessary. Read more...
Injections surgery. Traction surgery is quite effectivewith low complication ratr for cental canal stenosis foraminal stenosis is trickier to treat. Read more...
Somewhat. There are a multitude of treatments for spinal stenosis which to some extent can "cure" the symptoms of spinal stenosis to variable degrees. For example, an epidural steroid injection can sometimes cure the symptoms of spinal stenosis for a long time, sometimes well over a year at a time. But with any treatment, the symptoms can return, even if surgery is done symptoms can return. Read more...

Is there something that wraps around the spine that treats spinal stenosis?

Huh? Nothing can wrap around your spine to treat spinal stenosis. Spinal stenosis can be treated with core strengthening exercises, spinal injections and even possibly surgery if warranted. Read more...
No. No, not that I am aware of from a surgical perspective. Braces "wrap around the spine" and can be used to treat symptoms as can a tens unit. Read more...

How to treat sciatica from spinal stenosis?

Initial treatment is. NSAIDs or more beneficial steroids such as a Medrol (methylprednisolone) dose pak. Sit or sleep on hard surfaces. Soft overstuffed chairs and beds can make it worse. Bed rest is bad. Physical activity and therapy is key. . Read more...
Spine Pain Options. This chronic pain in the distribution as you suggested is the result of an irritated nerve or facet joints or other injury typically in the lumbar spine (low back) which are caused by herniated disks, spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease, etc requiring further evaluation by a spine specialist and may be candidate for facet injections/radiofrequency ablation and epidural steroid injection. Read more...
Varies . There are multiple options for treatment that get progressively more powerful, but also more involved: rest, time, medication, physical therapy, chiropractic care, advanced radiologic studies, interventional pain management, and (rarely) surgical considerations. Read more...

How do I treat spinal stenosis and 3 bulging discs without surgery effectively?

Consevatively. The problem is teo fold, buldging discs usually pos no surgical proble but this would depend on multiple factors, surgery is not necessay in buldging discs and esi and other non surgical procedures can help. Spinal stenosis wis also amiable to non surgical procedures but if the stenosis is compressing the cord wih pain in both legs when standing or lying but improves with bending, surgery probable. Read more...
/Do nothing . Usually if found by imaging may be an incidental finding if seen for back pain without any stenosis symptoms ie leg pain or numbness/tingling with standing/walking & better sitting or bending over- otherwise you may just have mechanical back pain that will do ok with exercise, weight control, avoiding tobacco and good sleep habits . The same can said for stenosis with +/-meds & epidural shots. Read more...

Review of options to treat spinal stenosis shows that laser surgery is best with 90 per cent cure and no down time after. Thoughts.

No. Laser surgery has not been shown to be a long term solution to spinal stenosis in randomized controlled clinical trials. I would not recommend this for my patients nor for a family member. Read more...
My thoughts. Just make sure the studies are double blind with no conflicts of interest reminds me of early idet results could not be indepenently verified in later studies by doctors not making money off the procedure or kyphoplasty, literature is rife with studies of subjective, unmeasurable outcomes by scientists with obvious conflicts of interest and bias, if it sounds too good to be true it probably is. Read more...

Just looked at med records for ongoing pain, have spinal stenosis, l4 l5 herniated discs which have been causing leg pain. How can I heal/treat this?

It depends on. Severity. Given your age, I would recommend conservative management with physical therapy, strengthen core muscle, medication to treat neuropathy, etc. For moderate to severe condition various kinds of epidural injection and various surgeries. Discuss with your provider in detail. . Read more...