Can others besids a dentist do cleaning, filling, root canal, make crowns and bridges, implants?

Legally, no. Only exception is in the Dental School. Here the Dental Student may perform these treatments under the supervision of a licensed Dentist on staff. Cleanings may be done by licensed Hygenist.
No. Dentistry is very complex and an experienced dentist needs to perform those procedures. it can be potentially life threatening otherwise. cleaning can be done by hygienist.
No! Can a chef build a bridge over the San Francisco Bay? It takes years of training to perform the services you have enumerated even remotely well, and in truth you are well protected not to have amateurs trying to do those jobs. Dentistry is a highly skilled craft and you should only have it provided by licensed practitioners who are qualified in those areas of treatment.
Not really. Not really. Theoretically by law medical doctors are also licensed to perform these procedures but they do not as it is outside their regular scope of practice.
Non PRO Care. Sure, street merchants in 3rd world countries provide dental care all the time. They are not licensed, have very little overhead and many times provide remarkable short term results. Most of my patients expect results that last years instead of months. I do too expect my care lasts years instead of months. Choose wisely.
General dentist. The dentist who offers all of these services is called a general dentist. First of all, through a general practice residency, and secondly, through continuing education throughout their careers, general dentists obtain proficiency in several disciplines of dentistry and can therefore provide a wide array of services to their patients.
Doctor. All of the procedures you listed can be performed by a dentist who has graduated and is licensed.
Only a dentist. A dentist is an accredited medical professional who specializes in the care of teeth, gums, and mouths and facial pain. Only a dentist can diagnose and treat dental disease applying different modalities.
General dentist. . A general dentist can do all of that. We also have specialist who can only do some these precedures. Like endodontist who are specialize in doing root canals and so on.
Illegal. To protect your safety your state evaluates your Dentist's education and training and grants a license to practice Dentistry. Anyone without licensure is a fraud, charlatan, crook, who should be reported to the police.

Related Questions

Can you get a filling/root canal with general anaesthetic?

Yes. There are a number of dentists and endodontists who are qualified by training or have hospital privileges that can perform your dental work under general anesthesia. Read more...
Yes. Fillings or root canals can be done with local anesthetic (novacaine) or for those patients who are fearful be done under sedation. Read more...
Comfort zone. A root canal is a common dental procedure. Sedation dentistry is used to provide a safe, comfortable relaxing and anxiety-free experience for certain people receiving any dental treatment. Depending on your degree of fear or anxiety, different levels of sedation may be required. Take care and have a comfortable experience. Read more...
You probably can, But local anesthesia should be adequate. The more medications you take the higher the risk and required monitoring and time for them to wear off. Read more...
Yes. Yes, root canals can be done under general anesthetic but this is typically a procedure that is done awake. In my case I work with a board certified specialist in anesthesia to perform these procedures asleep. Read more...
Yes. should to enough to control the area and fix the issue. Read more...
Yes. Yes. Some endodontists have anesthesiologist come to the dental office. Read more...

Are 42.40 for filling, root canal, or extraction?

D-code. If that is the code that you want to know what it is for it actually is for periodontic scalling and root planning...Deep cleaning with exposing the bone with a flap. Otherwise not sure what you are asking. Read more...
Code for gum surgery. Not sure exactly what you are asking, but 4240 is the ada code for gum surgery. Read more...

Root canal in november I got cleaning done and the dentist I went to he told me that I have cavaties in my bottom right 3 tooth... So I need to get filling done, week later he did the filling and he touch my wisdom tooth during that which got really badl

Sorry . Sorry you are having so much trouble. From what you described, the filling in your tooth is very deep, so deep that it is sitting right on top or touching the nerve in that tooth. It may or may not be infected yet.... Does the tooth hurt with hot or cold, especially cold? If so, the nerve is still alive. If it just hurts without sensitivity to thermal stimuli, then the nerve is dead. Either way, if you are in so much pain, you will need root canal therapy. The therapy involves removal of that affected nerve so that your tooth won't hurt. It is a common procedure and not unexpected considering how deep the filling is. It is too bad your first dentist did not explain this to you when he did the filling. You would not be suffering and would have already had the root canal started. Read more...
The . The most common cause of a toothache is extensive decay in a tooth that reaches the hollow part of the tooth where the nerve and blood supply are located. Treating a cavity removes all the decay, however decay that has come close or invaded the pulp (nerve) can cause inflammation and pain. Root canal therapy is the treatment required to resolve the pain. Read more...
Get checked! I believe you meant to say that now your wisdom tooth hurts badly. Maybe you have a cavity in the wisdom tooth as well? Sometimes these teeth are difficult to restore and are extracted. Other times, if its in an area that accessible, it can be filled or root canal can be done if necessary. Good luck. Read more...

Temp filling after root canal damaged? Have seen dentist. Crown scheduled later this week. Is there a great risk for another infection before?

Should be OK. If u have temp filling for a root canal procedure that is scheduled in a few days, your dentist can prescribe prophylactic antibiotic now to provide needed protection for the duration. If you are unable to get the meds before the scheduled date, call their office if you start feeling any pain or swelling in the area. Read more...
Temporary filling. It is not uncommon for a temp filling in a tooth that had a root canal to wear down or chip away, especially if some time has elapsed between the root canal and getting a crown. If not too much time has elapsed, and the root canal opening is still sealed, re-infection should not be a problem. Your dentist should check to make sure there is no problem before starting the crown. Read more...
Probably Not. The purpose of the temporary filling after root canal treatment is to prevent the influx of bacteria from your mouth. If you damaged the temporary but the dentist checked it and did not feel it necessary to immediately replace it you probably didn't cause any damage. Replace the temporary with the crown anytime after the initial inflammation passes but not longer than 30 days. See your DDS. Read more...
You should be fine. Risk of additional infection in such a short time is virtual nil. Read more...
No worries. If the root canal is complete, your main concern should be: do not eat on this tooth as to avoid tooth breakage. See your dentist for a final crown restoration. Good luck. Read more...
Timing. Important that final restoration be placed ASAP to seal the root canal treatment. If you saw Dentist before temporary broke, call Dentist immediately to report compromised seal and to see if Dentist wants to see you. If Dentist saw the broken temporary and has deemed it still a successful seal, don't worry. Read more...

Is crown work really necessary? I had to have an anterior root canal redone from 8 years ago. I had an apicoectomy. The dentist pointed out that the original work was only a filling, no crown work was done. Part of my patient plan now includes crown work

Only . Only by clinical exam and an x-ray will you get the true answer to your question. Back teeth in general need some support after root canals to prevent fracture-not so for front teeth unless there are other factors such as appearance or weakened tooth structure. If you're not sure get a second opinion. Read more...
Your . Your best bet is to get a second opinion from a prosthodontist, which is the expert in cosmetic and restorative dentistry. In the front teeth, most times, a crown is not necessary. As a matter of fact, if the crown you get is of lower quality, it will give you more problems then you've had so far, and you are sure to lose a tooth in the next 10 years. Go and get a second opinion from the expert. www.gotoapro.org will have a link to an expert near you. Read more...
Just . Just remember that after a tooth had a root canal, the tooth will be weaker and more prone to fracture. In general, be extra careful with that tooth when biting into certain foods. Read more...
When . When the nerve is taken out of a tooth, the blood supply, oxygen, fluids everything is taken out. The tooth is cleaned and sealed, and that was eight years ago. There is nothing bringing nutrients to the tooth any longer, and it is gradually getting more an more brittle. We usually recommend that the tooth should be reinforced with a post within 5-7years by which time the brittleness will have in creased to the point where the tooth can no longer withstand the pressure of the bite. The tooth then needs reinforcing with a post and a crown. Your dentist has made the recommendation, and mine is that you take his advice. You can not allow insurance to influence the quality of your healthcare particularly when it comes to dentistry. Dr neil mcleod dds dentistry that lasts - quality that counts. Read more...

My front tooth undergone a root canal instead of putting a crown after the treatment, my dentist put a permanent filling. Is it the same with crown?

No better. actually what you had is better than crown crown is preserved to a tooth that lost some of the surface so instead of removing it the crown will save ir by replacing the lost surface you are good good luck. Read more...

Filling caused root canal and crown - dentist at fault?

Not Necessarily . If the tooth had a large cavity, large filling or a crack then the root canal and crown may have been unavoidable. Sometimes we (dentists) try to be conservative or shall i say a hero and try to do a filling on a tooth that needs a root canal and/or a crown. You should trust your dentist feel free to ask questions and request your xrays and get a second opinion if you are ever not sure. Read more...
Need more info. Root canal treatment is usually needed to treat an infection. On occasion it is required for restoring the tooth to function. If the pulp (organ found in tooth) was exposed due to depth of decay root canal treatment is appropriate. Please offer more information that lead up to your treatment. I am unable to offer any further opinion. Read more...
Damaged tooth. Dental fillings do not cause a tooth's nerve to detriorate. By the time a tooth requires a large filling, the inside of the tooth has already sustained irritation. Teeth respond differently to treatment. The dentist is not at fault for redering care. The patient is responsible for the original condition of the tooth. There could be an internal fracture due to habitual clenching. Read more...
Thanks for asking! A fillings most important function is to be leak proof. When the tooth is prepared for a filling not all of the bacteria is removed. Some are still hiding in the tooth structure and will continue to decay the tooth at a slower rate when covered by the filling because there is little to no oral fluids leaking in to feed the bugs. In time the bugs win again and then you get a root canal and crown. Read more...
No. With the change of a filling or fixing deep decay you run the risk of the nerve dying and the need of root canal. Read more...
Yes, No, Maybe? I can't give you a better answer than that. I didn't examine you, see x-rays of the tooth nor treat you (nor watch what the dentist did or did not do). I understand how you might feel relating the two in a cause\effect relationship, but teeth often require rct even with the best dentist doing all the right things. Who is at fault for getting the cavity in the first place? Read more...
NO. Root canal is a consequence of an old filling probably cracked, leaking, with caries underneath. Root canal will eliminate the infection and crown will protect the tooth. Dentist is ok. Read more...
Not necessarily . Without more information it is impossible to tell. With any larger cavity you run the risk of needing a root canal and/or crown. Read more...