What is the relationship between kidneys and high blood pressure?

Close relationship. The kidneys are one of the primary filters of toxins from blood. They also serve to maintain salt and water balance in the body. The kidneys release chemicals that increase blood pressure to maintain a consistant flow of blood through them. The process is very efficient until outside forces come into play such as obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, excessive salt intake.
Organ system. Kidney is one of the organ system that regulate the blood pressure -- so if you have high blood pressure, your kidney is evaluated as well because it can effect and be effected by high blood pressure.

Related Questions

Does high blood pressure affect my kidneys?

Yes. High blood pressure is one of the leading diseases that can damage your the kidneys. Uncontrolled high blood pressure can lead to chronic kidney disease and eventually dialysis. However if your blood pressure is well controlled, your kidney will not be damaged. Read more...

Why does high blood pressure ruin your kidneys?

Kidneys are delicate. The kidneys filter all of your blood 24 hours a day. In order to filter the blood, they have a very delicate system of membranes and tissues to keep the good stuff in and let the bad stuff go out. When your blood pressure is always high, it puts a lot of stress on these delicate parts. The kidneys then respond by trying to thicken up the membranes, which causes problems filtering blood. Read more...

What is the connection between alcohol and high blood pressure?

Increased risk. People who drink more than two alcoholic beverages per day (one drink being a glass of wine, a beer, or a shot of liquor) have about double the risk of developing high blood pressure. Studies have shown that people who drink to excess can reduce their blood pressure by cutting down on alcohol. Read more...
It may raise it. Alcohol is a widespread (and often missed) cause of secondary hypertension, because doctors either do not take a good alcohol use history or because the patient doesn't give accurate information. Usually it takes more than 7 drinks/week in women and older men, and 14/week in younger men to cause problems, and its usually quite a bit more than that. In many cases, reduction or stopping "cures" hbp. Read more...