6 doctors weighed in:
How do you treat reiter’s syndrome?
6 doctors weighed in

Dr. Chad Boomershine
Internal Medicine - Rheumatology
4 doctors agree
In brief: Depends on the cause
Reiter's syndrome is a reactive arthritis that occurs in response to an infection.
The infection can be viral or bacterial. The infection tricks the body into producing an immune response against itself. Symptomatic treatments like steroids and anti-inflammatories can help symptoms. However, the underlying autoimmunity requires drugs to suppress the immune response by a rheumatologist.

In brief: Depends on the cause
Reiter's syndrome is a reactive arthritis that occurs in response to an infection.
The infection can be viral or bacterial. The infection tricks the body into producing an immune response against itself. Symptomatic treatments like steroids and anti-inflammatories can help symptoms. However, the underlying autoimmunity requires drugs to suppress the immune response by a rheumatologist.
Dr. Chad Boomershine
Dr. Chad Boomershine
Thank
Dr. David Greenfield
Internal Medicine - Rheumatology
In brief: Many treatments
Reiter's syndrome is now called "reactive arthritis".
There are a number of causes that are likely such as bacterial GI infections, sexually transmitted diseases, and unknown sources. The disease is not the infection itself. It is a result of antibodies formed that "attack" the body. Treatments run the gamut from aspirin-like meds(nonsteroidals) to Methotrexate and even biologic drugs(enbrel).

In brief: Many treatments
Reiter's syndrome is now called "reactive arthritis".
There are a number of causes that are likely such as bacterial GI infections, sexually transmitted diseases, and unknown sources. The disease is not the infection itself. It is a result of antibodies formed that "attack" the body. Treatments run the gamut from aspirin-like meds(nonsteroidals) to Methotrexate and even biologic drugs(enbrel).
Dr. David Greenfield
Dr. David Greenfield
Thank
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