7 doctors weighed in:
How is chest pain defined clinically?
7 doctors weighed in

Dr. Mary Callahan
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
5 doctors agree
In brief: Usually by the cause
Chest pain is discomfort located between the shoulders and abdomen.
Cardiac chest pain, or angina, is usually described as pain or pressure feeling that occurs with activity, goes away with rest, and may be associated with shortness of breath, sweatiness, lightheadedness or nausea. Other causes of chest pain include gi, pulmonary or skeletal. Often it is characterized by being acute or chronic.

In brief: Usually by the cause
Chest pain is discomfort located between the shoulders and abdomen.
Cardiac chest pain, or angina, is usually described as pain or pressure feeling that occurs with activity, goes away with rest, and may be associated with shortness of breath, sweatiness, lightheadedness or nausea. Other causes of chest pain include gi, pulmonary or skeletal. Often it is characterized by being acute or chronic.
Dr. Mary Callahan
Dr. Mary Callahan
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Dr. Budi Bahureksa
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
In brief: Good question
Chest pain is like a code word to get a 911 medical attention -- angina pectoris, a true cardiac pain is more like excruciating pressure, tightness, almost always accompanied by nausea, change of breathing or shortness or breath, cold sweat, and feeling like you are going to go out -- and if it's not relieved spontaneously then it's a heart attack!

In brief: Good question
Chest pain is like a code word to get a 911 medical attention -- angina pectoris, a true cardiac pain is more like excruciating pressure, tightness, almost always accompanied by nausea, change of breathing or shortness or breath, cold sweat, and feeling like you are going to go out -- and if it's not relieved spontaneously then it's a heart attack!
Dr. Budi Bahureksa
Dr. Budi Bahureksa
Thank
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