13 doctors weighed in:
Doctor confirmed my child has atrial septal defect and will need to follow up. Will this be a longterm problem?
13 doctors weighed in

Dr. Steven Ajluni
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
6 doctors agree
In brief: ASD
An ASD requires noninvasive studies (echo/mri) to gauge the ratio of blood that is shunted from left to right.
Assessment of possibly associated congenital abnormalities is necessary. Gauging (over time) changes in symptom status, such as dyspnea with exertion, and signs of right heart pressure/volume overload and/or pulmonary hypertension are important to follow too.

In brief: ASD
An ASD requires noninvasive studies (echo/mri) to gauge the ratio of blood that is shunted from left to right.
Assessment of possibly associated congenital abnormalities is necessary. Gauging (over time) changes in symptom status, such as dyspnea with exertion, and signs of right heart pressure/volume overload and/or pulmonary hypertension are important to follow too.
Dr. Steven Ajluni
Dr. Steven Ajluni
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Dr. Marco Paliotta
Surgery - Thoracic
5 doctors agree
In brief: Not really.
Atrial septal defects are the most benign congenital heart defects.
A small percentage may become smaller over time and close on there own. If not, they can be closed by the cardiologist with a device or by the surgeon. Either way, there is virtually 100% success with minimal (if any) morbidity.

In brief: Not really.
Atrial septal defects are the most benign congenital heart defects.
A small percentage may become smaller over time and close on there own. If not, they can be closed by the cardiologist with a device or by the surgeon. Either way, there is virtually 100% success with minimal (if any) morbidity.
Dr. Marco Paliotta
Dr. Marco Paliotta
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David Miller
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Not likely
An atrial septal defect is a hole in the wall dividing the upper chambers of the heart.
It is a fairly common diagnosis, about 4 per 10, 000 live births. These often will close on their own by school age. If not, they are very easily repaired with minimally-invasive techniques. A pediatric cardiologist will need to follow them till the hole closes either naturally or surgically.

In brief: Not likely
An atrial septal defect is a hole in the wall dividing the upper chambers of the heart.
It is a fairly common diagnosis, about 4 per 10, 000 live births. These often will close on their own by school age. If not, they are very easily repaired with minimally-invasive techniques. A pediatric cardiologist will need to follow them till the hole closes either naturally or surgically.
David Miller
David Miller
Answer assisted by David Miller, Medical Student
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