4 doctors weighed in:

My doctor says I have knee cap tendon rupture, but I don't understand. What does it mean?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. JP Bramhall
Sports Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: Tendon Injuries

Injuries to the tendons on either side of the knee cap or patella can be either chronic or acute.
Chronic injuries are more likely to be tendinitis with small partial tears. Acute injuries can be associated with a complete tear or rupture of the tendon. The tendon above the patella attaching to the quadriceps muscle is the quad tendon. The tendon below the patella is the patellar tendon.

In brief: Tendon Injuries

Injuries to the tendons on either side of the knee cap or patella can be either chronic or acute.
Chronic injuries are more likely to be tendinitis with small partial tears. Acute injuries can be associated with a complete tear or rupture of the tendon. The tendon above the patella attaching to the quadriceps muscle is the quad tendon. The tendon below the patella is the patellar tendon.
Dr. JP Bramhall
Dr. JP Bramhall
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Dr. Robert Purchase
Orthopedic Surgery

In brief: If complete, surgery

Dr. Bramhall's description is on the money.
If the tendon is torn completely, it will not heal well without surgery. If it does not heal well, you will not be able to walk without significant problems. Except for patients who are extremely ill, all knee cap tendon ruptures require surgery.

In brief: If complete, surgery

Dr. Bramhall's description is on the money.
If the tendon is torn completely, it will not heal well without surgery. If it does not heal well, you will not be able to walk without significant problems. Except for patients who are extremely ill, all knee cap tendon ruptures require surgery.
Dr. Robert Purchase
Dr. Robert Purchase
Thank
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