6 doctors weighed in:
How do you treat bee stings?
6 doctors weighed in

Dr. Andrew Murphy
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
4 doctors agree
In brief: See Allergists
Bee sting reactions can be relatively benign to life ending.
In general local reactions to sting require symptomatic treatment. Reactions that occur away from sting site like hives, wheezing, lip or tongue swelling require more aggressive treatment like immunotherapy. Rarely, bee sting reactions uncover another disease called mastocytosis. Proper tx requires seeing an allergist.

In brief: See Allergists
Bee sting reactions can be relatively benign to life ending.
In general local reactions to sting require symptomatic treatment. Reactions that occur away from sting site like hives, wheezing, lip or tongue swelling require more aggressive treatment like immunotherapy. Rarely, bee sting reactions uncover another disease called mastocytosis. Proper tx requires seeing an allergist.
Dr. Andrew Murphy
Dr. Andrew Murphy
Thank
Dr. Gary Steven
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Many ways
Mild reactions don't need to be treated.
Increasing redness over a few days suggests an infection of the skin that requires treatment with antibiotics. Allergic reactions such as hives, wheezing or shock should be evaluated. Carrying an Epinephrine autoinjector keeps people alive until they get to the er, but the only real treatment for bee sting allergies is immunotherapy from an allergist.

In brief: Many ways
Mild reactions don't need to be treated.
Increasing redness over a few days suggests an infection of the skin that requires treatment with antibiotics. Allergic reactions such as hives, wheezing or shock should be evaluated. Carrying an Epinephrine autoinjector keeps people alive until they get to the er, but the only real treatment for bee sting allergies is immunotherapy from an allergist.
Dr. Gary Steven
Dr. Gary Steven
Thank
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