8 doctors weighed in:

Are there lifestyle changes that really make getting rhinitis less likely?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gary Steven
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
4 doctors agree

In brief: Not really

If you are genetically predisposed to allergic rhinitis, reducing your exposure to common allergens might help, but the catch-22 is that you won't know which allergens you will react to until you start developing signs of allergic rhinitis.
Irritant rhinitis can improve by limiting exposure to irritants such as perfumes and chemicals in your environment; avoid infectious rhinitis with good hygiene.

In brief: Not really

If you are genetically predisposed to allergic rhinitis, reducing your exposure to common allergens might help, but the catch-22 is that you won't know which allergens you will react to until you start developing signs of allergic rhinitis.
Irritant rhinitis can improve by limiting exposure to irritants such as perfumes and chemicals in your environment; avoid infectious rhinitis with good hygiene.
Dr. Gary Steven
Dr. Gary Steven
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Dr. Arthur Torre
Pediatrics - Allergy & Asthma
2 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

Most rhinitis is related to allergy (and sometimes colds).
So an allergy friendly environment is very important - especially in the bedroom where people spend about 8 hours a day in there most "allergically" vulnerable state. So - cover mattress box spring and pillow with special encasings, no rugs, keep pets out of that room and windows closed during pollen season.

In brief: Yes

Most rhinitis is related to allergy (and sometimes colds).
So an allergy friendly environment is very important - especially in the bedroom where people spend about 8 hours a day in there most "allergically" vulnerable state. So - cover mattress box spring and pillow with special encasings, no rugs, keep pets out of that room and windows closed during pollen season.
Dr. Arthur Torre
Dr. Arthur Torre
Thank
2 comments
Dr. Gary Steven
Not that I would disagree with this advice, but I always recommend seeing an allergist for skin testing before making any environmental modifications. If you aren't allergic to dust mites, pets, or pollens, these interventions are simply inconveniences that won't help you.
Dr. Arvind Madaan
Agree with Dr. Steven - "targeted and meaningful avoidance."
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Dr. Steven Seres
Board Certified, Internal Medicine
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