17 doctors weighed in:
What can happen to a diabetic that has sores on the foot that will not heal ?
17 doctors weighed in

Dr. Otto Placik
Surgery - Plastics
9 doctors agree
In brief: Bone infection
Eventually bone infection called osteomyelitis can form or a spreading soft tissue infection called necrotizing fasciitis can develop.
This can eventually produce tissue loss as well as loss of limb and life.

In brief: Bone infection
Eventually bone infection called osteomyelitis can form or a spreading soft tissue infection called necrotizing fasciitis can develop.
This can eventually produce tissue loss as well as loss of limb and life.
Dr. Otto Placik
Dr. Otto Placik
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1 comment
Dr. Martin Raff
Unfortunately because of diminished vascularity, neuropathy, hyperglycemia and other factors, treating such infections is often difficult. As Dr. Sojico indicated, extension from the soft tissues to bone is common in such patients, and treatment difficult and often unsuccessful without surgical extirpation of the area involved.
Dr. Douglas Fronzaglia
Internal Medicine - Geriatrics
5 doctors agree
In brief: Infection
An open sore on the foot of a diabetic is serious.
First, diabetics have more difficulty fighting infection. Next, poorly controlled diabetics can have decreased blood flow to their extremities. Lastly, they can experience poor wound healing. All of these together can create a situation that will require a very aggresive approach to prevent spread to the rest of the foot.

In brief: Infection
An open sore on the foot of a diabetic is serious.
First, diabetics have more difficulty fighting infection. Next, poorly controlled diabetics can have decreased blood flow to their extremities. Lastly, they can experience poor wound healing. All of these together can create a situation that will require a very aggresive approach to prevent spread to the rest of the foot.
Dr. Douglas Fronzaglia
Dr. Douglas Fronzaglia
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Dr. David Wishnew
Wound care
4 doctors agree
In brief: Diabetic foot sore
Often, a ulcer that is open for an extended period becomes infected.
But, because the pain usually associated with a sore is absent, there may be rapid and dangerous progression of the underlying infection. In many cases, this leads to amputation of either toes or part of the foot. In the worst case scenario (short of fatal sepsis), an untreated diabetic sore can lead to amputation of the leg.

In brief: Diabetic foot sore
Often, a ulcer that is open for an extended period becomes infected.
But, because the pain usually associated with a sore is absent, there may be rapid and dangerous progression of the underlying infection. In many cases, this leads to amputation of either toes or part of the foot. In the worst case scenario (short of fatal sepsis), an untreated diabetic sore can lead to amputation of the leg.
Dr. David Wishnew
Dr. David Wishnew
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1 comment
Dr. Scott Keith
One of the main reasons the ulcer starts is that the diabetes has rendered the foot neuropathic. The feeling is reduced or in many cases absent. If a patient without neuropathy had an ulcer like on many diabetic feet, they would be screaming in pain. But without feeling, these wounds go undetected until it becomes complicated with infection.
Dr. Annette Occhialini
Surgery - Plastics
4 doctors agree
In brief: See a doc
Sores on the feet of a diabetic are a serious problem. They could be a sign of infection and or poor circulation.
If left untreated they could result in amputation. Sometimes despite everything it still comes down to an amputation to get the wounds healed.

In brief: See a doc
Sores on the feet of a diabetic are a serious problem. They could be a sign of infection and or poor circulation.
If left untreated they could result in amputation. Sometimes despite everything it still comes down to an amputation to get the wounds healed.
Dr. Annette Occhialini
Dr. Annette Occhialini
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Dr. Vasu Brown
Wound care
3 doctors agree
In brief: Might need surgery
Chronic diabetic ulcers will end up requiring amputation - need to be vigilant to avoid this.

In brief: Might need surgery
Chronic diabetic ulcers will end up requiring amputation - need to be vigilant to avoid this.
Dr. Vasu Brown
Dr. Vasu Brown
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