After prostate cancer surgery how long before erection is possible?

It varies. I've seen return of erections from as soon as one month after radical prostatectomy to as long as two years. The usual time frame i give my patients is closer to the 1.5-2 year window.

Related Questions

How soon can I try sex after prostate cancer surgery?

Surgery Question. Ask the doctor that did your surgery. Read more...
While your. Urologist may have another answer, if you can achieve an erection, you may attempt sexual intercourse. Do not anticipate an ejaculation (which is different from an orgasm), since the prostate makes the majority of the juice in an ejaculate, and your prostate is now gone. It's good you are thinking about sex which means your libido works. Good luck! Read more...

Can a man? Still? Father? Kids after prostate cancer surgery?

Yes, but... A man will not be able to father children through natural intercourse however will still produce sperm, which can be extracted to combine with a woman's eggs. Read more...
Prostatectomy. Eliminates the organ that produces seminal fluid (the testis makes the sperm). Nerve sparing can allow for erction and orgasm, but ejaculate and juice are eliminated by gland removal. The testis may make sperm that can be extracted to fertilize in vitro. Read more...

How will prostate cancer surgery affect my sexual life?

You will never. Ejaculate post surgery; some can preserve potency; the issue of continence at 30 days, 1 year for the surgeon and technique. Get opinions about other therapy. Much is related to selection rather than the treatment itself. Caveat emptor. Read more...
Significantly. It will change. Even if potency is preserved (70% in the best of hands), it will be dry. You need to look at all the options. Cancer doesn't help either. Decide with your partner what is best and go forward with faith! Read more...

What is the mortality rate with prostate cancer surgery?

Prostate surgery. It is minimall. Some people say it s close to zero. It is really small. There is an open technique, radical prostatectomy and laparoscopic technique. Although laparoscopy is gaining field, apparently there is a higher rate of urinary incontinence and recurrence with laproscopy. Your urologyst should be able to give you uptodate information on the procedure. Hope it helps. Read more...
Extremely low. If i'm reading this right, you're asking about the mortality rate of surgery in general. That would vary from hospital to hospital, according to a study published in the new england journal of medicine, from 3.9% in low mortality rate hospitals to 6.9% in high mortality rate hospitals. The mortality rate associated with prostatectomy itself is very low. Read more...
.3 per cent. With a general anesthesia 1 in 10, 000 will die. In adsorción that cardiac and vascular complicaciones can and will add to this. Read more...
Nearly 0. The mortality rate should be less than 0.1% for patients undergoing this surgery. Read more...
Low but not zero. In the recently published pivot trial assessing prostate surgery vs. Observation, there was 1 death out of 364 men undergoing surgery (0.3%) and adverse events after surgery occurred in 21% of patients (within 30 days). Read more...

What important questions should I ask my erologist/surgeon before prostate cancer surgery?

Impot, incont, mets. Ask about his statistics on side effects like impotence ( ed), urine incontinence and possibilities of metastasis or recurrence of the cancer. Is it robotic?, is it sphincter sparing? Read more...
Prostatectomy. You need to ask everything about the surgery-- how the procedure will be done ( robotic?); the succesful rate of surgery? What are the risks, possible complictaions/side effects related to surgery ( problem with urination; impotent risk, bleeding , pain, etc); you also need to know what is the step after you have surgery? Etc. What is your gleason's score, by the way? Read more...

My friend is scheduled to have prostate cancer surgery in a few days. What should he expect as far as post surgery complications are concerned?

Hopefully few. The most common surgical risks are bleeding, damage to structures/organs surrounding the prostate and post-surgical infection. With the advancement of minimally invasive surgery/robotics, many of these risks have decreased. However, also depends on surgeon experience and patient factors as well. There is also risks of incontinence and erectile dysfunction following any prostate procedure. Read more...
Know possibilities. You should never have surgery without discussing the risks and complications as well as expected side effects directly from the surgeon. A consent is mandatory and when it's signed it means all of this is understood. An incision and catheter is expected. There can be bleeding, infection and pain as possibilities. Though less common he may come out of it incontinent and impotent. Read more...
Depends. Outcomes vary based on technique and type of procedure. Read more...

Post prostate cancer surgery problem bladder neck contracture. Please help me with this?

BNC. There is only two solutions for this, either urethral dilutions or incision of the bladder neck(surgery). Read more...
Depends. Mild BNC urethral dilation. More significant BNC:cystoscopy & making a cut in the scar tissue.Severe BNC:Simultaneous telescope through urethra & through tiny incision above pubic bone & laser incision is done to minimize tissue trauma.Hope you have a minor BNC. Good luck. Read more...
Here are some ... Managing bladder neck contracture (BNC) can be tricky in its limited anatomical & functional room to work on although empirical dilation of BNC may suit some & laser or incision of BNC for others. I personally prefer using low-power Green-light to circumferentially round it out an opening like dilation but with less trauma. Before either, patient needs to be counseled for realistic expectation. Read more...

Have severe stomach/gut pain at night. Started losartan potassium tab 25 mg 1x daily since 4/21.Blood prehad prostate cancer surgery &radiation 3 yrs?

Losartan and pain. The chances of your gut pain being due to your low dose of losartan (l) are pretty small. L is a drug of the angiotensin receptor blocker class (arb). Arb's are known to have very few adverse effects and abdominal pain is not one of them. See a physician for the cause of your pain. Good luck. Read more...