What is osteonecrosis of the jaw?

A drug side-effect. The drugs for osteoporosis and metastatic bone cancer called bisphosphonates (includes fosamax, actonel, boniva, reclast, (zoledronic acid) zometa, aredia) are associated with a side-effect where part of the bone of the jaw dies, the gum sloughs off, and bone shows where the gum was lost. It is treatable but not always curable. It has also been found with bevicizumab, an anti-cancer drug, and after jaw radiation.
Dead bone. Dead bone in jaw. Usually due to radiation treatment to jaw for cancer. or bone building medications. Serious problem. See oral surgeon for exam/diagnosis/treatment.
Tissue death. Dr. Hinshaw's answer is quite correct regarding osteonecrosis secondary to medication. It is important to know that osteonecrosis is not confined to the jaw, but rather any bone that continues to lose blood supply and vitality. Certain bacteria are implicated as well. Cutting away dead tissue is a must, and sometimes a patient needs to be put in a hyperbaric chamber (high pressure oxygen). Serious.
Osteonecrosis jaw. Osteonecrosis of the jaw, commonly called ONJ, occurs when the jaw bone is exposed and begins to starve from a lack of blood. http://www.rheumatology.org/I-Am-A/Patient-Caregiver/Diseases-Conditions/Osteonecrosis-of-the-Jaw-ONJ.

Related Questions

What are symptoms of osteonecrosis of the jaw?

Exposed bone. Osteonecrosis of the jaw can be from a variety of medical issues. Meaning, dead bone, osteonecrosis can be a result of radiation, certain medications or chronic infection. Symptoms can range from a constant draining of an abscess through the skin to exposed painless bone in the mouth. See your oral and maxillofacial surgeon if you are concerned. This is a very serious condition. Read more...
Pain swelling. Pain, swelling, exposed bone. Causes radiation of jaw vs certain bone building medications. See oral surgeon ASAP for exam/diagnosis/treatment. Read more...

I was wondering what are symptoms of osteonecrosis of the jaw?

Osteonecrosis of jaw. Onj- the exposure of mandibular or maxillary bone through lesions in the gingiva that does not heal; pain and inflammation of the surrounding soft tissues, and possibly secondary infection or drainage. Read more...
Pain swellilng. Pain swelling of the jaw, sometimes exposed bone. Usually after tooth extraction. not always. See oral surgeon to sort things out. Read more...

How painful is osteonecrosis of the jaw?

Osteonecrosis. This most often is painful but there are times where there is not much pain. You cannot use this as diagnostic symptom. You need to have your dentist evaluate things to make sure what is going on. Read more...
Range of pain. Can range from no symptoms to extremely painful. Hard for patient to self diagnose. Sometimes diagnosis easy, sometimes hard. Best person to see is oral surgeon. Read more...

Why could you have to have your jaw removed with osteonecrosis of the jaw?

Could save... It could save you from loosing more of your jaw... Read more...
Dead bone. Osteonecrosis is dead bone. If the disease keeps progressing, the jaw may have to be resected for cure. Difficult problem. Make sure you are managed by an oral & maxillofacial surgeon. Read more...

I was wondering what is the risk of Fosamax (alendronate) to osteonecrosis of the jaw?

Osteonecrosis. Fosamax (alendronate) ; other drugs in the same drug class increase the risk of osteonecrosis following extractions and other dental surgery. However, it tends to occur mostly with IV and long term use. See http://www.Webmd.Com/osteoporosis/news/20090101/fosamax-higher-risk-of-jawbone-death. Read more...
Risk is low. Risk of osteonecrosis is low but not zero. If you plan on having an extraction, make sure you see an oral surgeon. He knows what to do to minimize the risk. Read more...

How much of a risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw is associated with fosamax (alendronate)?

See details. This is a very rarely phenomenon and has been associated most likely after dental implants or extractions, not after routine dental care. The incidence has been estimated at 3 per 100, 000 users of fosamax (alendronate). Read more...
Rare, but. It is rare with oral bisphosphonates like Fosamax (alendronate). More common with IV bisphosphonates. However, medicine related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) is suck a devastating disease, that precautions are in order for any dental extraction procedure. Oral surgery evaluation recommended for any patient on Fosamaz. Read more...

Can you tell me more about problem with Fosamax (alendronate) and osteonecrosis of the jaw?

Low risk. There is a definite but low risk of developing osteonecrosis (dead bone) in patients who have taken fosamax (alendronate). The risk is higher for other bone building medications taken intravenously. Patients taking Fosamax (alendronate) should discuss any dental procedures with the dentist to see if special precautions must be taken. Sometimes, a 3 month holiday from Fosamax (alendronate) is helpful to minimise the risk of osteonecrosis. Read more...

What are the risks of Fosamax (alendronate) to osteonecrosis of the jaw?

Biphosphonates. From: http://www.merck.com ONJ, which can occur spontaneously, is generally associated with tooth extraction and/or local infection with delayed healing, and has been reported in patients taking bisphosphonates, including FOSAMAX (alendronate). Clinical judgment of the treating physician and/or oral surgeon should guide the management plan of each patient based on individual benefit/risk assessment. Read more...
Many. I would consult with your Dr., and maybe even get a second opinion and consider talking to a pharmacist. Read more...
Small risk. Small risk of medication related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ). It MRONJ can occur spontaneously, but most often follows a oral surgical procedure like tooth extraction. Any dental procedure done in a patient on Fosamax (alendronate) or other bisphosphonates should be managed by an oral surgeon. Read more...
Uncommon risk. but Fosamax (alendronate) use was conclusively linked to osteonecrosis of the jaw. Ask your OS for more info. Read more...