What's the most natural treatment for phantom limb?

Mirror therapy. There have been a few studies on this and it was even in an episode of house!. It involves using an optical illusion with a mirror to make it seem like the amputated limb is still there. You then contract and move the remaining limb while looking at the mirror. It changes your perception of the amputated side and over time may help to "rewire the brain" look up mirror therapy for more details.
Many Options Exist. There are many interventions that have been used that do not involve systemic medicines or surgery, with mixed effects. These include acupuncture, local injections of pain medicines, psychotherapy, physical therapy, biofeedback, proper prosthesis choice, far infrared ray therapy, mirror feedback therapy and transcutaneous nerve stimulation are some of the more studied alternative therapies.

Related Questions

What is the treatment for chronic phantom limb pain?

Phantom pain. Yes, you can. However, try to avoid any narcotics to control your phantom pain. Because the narcotics, such as lortab, morphine, tramadal etc, will decrease your endorphine production from your brain and spine by negative feeding back, which will make you sensative to the pain. Acupuncture is an appropriate way to control phantom pain by increase endorphine and and by balancing pain out. Read more...

What are the symptoms involved with a phantom limb?

Sensation. Phantom limb symptoms are that the limb is still there even after an amputation. Phantom pain is pain in the limb even if it is not there. Read more...

Any solution for missing limb- phantom limb sensation?

Gabapentin. Phantom limb pain has been a mystery for decades. It derives from the brain centers that expect input from nerves from a limb that no longer exists. This type of neuritic pain will sometimes respond to Gabapentin or perhaps tricyclics. Read more...

What are people using for chronic phantom limb pain?

Phantom pain. Try to avoid any narcotics for phantom pain. Because the narcotics, such as lortab, morphine, tramadal etc, will decrease endorphine production by negative feeding back, and make you more sensative to the pain. Acupuncture, antidepresants, such as ssri, nerve membrane stabilizers, such as neurotin, lyrica, (pregabalin) trileptal, Lamictal are commonly used. Read more...

What causes phantom limb pain after amputation?

See below. No one is really sure although the evidence suggests that if the limb was painful prior to the amputation, there is a higher liklihood of phantom pain after the amputation. Read more...
Many factors. The exact cause of phantom limb pain is not completely clear. Cutting the nerves that went to the limb and later attempts by the body to heal the nerve play a role. It is also known that the area of the brain that controlled movement of the limb prior to the amputation may interpret sensation from the stump as coming from the amputated portion of the limb and that this might be painful. Read more...
Unknown. You are asking what causes phantom limb sensation. There are limits in medicine. We know patients describe phantom pain and sensation after amputation. Research continues to show new insights but your doctor will be able to refer you to a neurologist. Read more...

Can I use cymbalta (duloxetine) to treat my chronic phantom limb pain?

Phantom pain. Yes, you can. However, try to avoid any narcotics to control your phantom pain. Because the narcotics, such as lortab, morphine, tramadal etc, will decrease your endorphine production from your brain and spine by negative feeding back, which will make you sensative to the pain. Acupuncture is an appropriate way to control phantom pain by increase endorphine and and by balancing pain out. Read more...

What are typical symptoms of phantom limb?

See below. Phantom limb syndrome is the term for when a person still feels the limb after amputation of that limb. It is thought to be a phenomenon that is generated in the brain by our "map" of that body part that has existed since birth. In most people this phantom fades away with time. In a small number of people, their will be pain in the phantom limb and this is a more difficult situation. Read more...

How can phantom limb pain be treated?

Drugs. From a pharmacotherapeutic standpoint, phantom pain can be treated with Neurontin (gabapentin) ot Lyrica (pregabalin) for fairly good results. Read more...
Phantom Limb. It is quite common for amputees to experience sensations on the removed limb. Many times it is pains, for others, it can feel different (itching for example). A study reported in nejm found that using a mirror to 'visualize' the removed body part actually helped resolve those sensations. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmc071927. No matter what, discuss things with your doctor or surgeon. Read more...