11 doctors weighed in:
What predisposes someone to phantom limb?
11 doctors weighed in

Dr. Sean MacKenzie
Physical & Rehabilitation Medicine
8 doctors agree
In brief: Common
Having a limb before amputation.
Almost everyone who has had an amputation gets phantom limb - the sensation that the limb is still there. It often feels like the limb is longer or shorter than it used to be (telescoping) or that it is at a different angle. This is different from phantom pain, which will affect a smaller % of the people with amputations.

In brief: Common
Having a limb before amputation.
Almost everyone who has had an amputation gets phantom limb - the sensation that the limb is still there. It often feels like the limb is longer or shorter than it used to be (telescoping) or that it is at a different angle. This is different from phantom pain, which will affect a smaller % of the people with amputations.
Dr. Sean MacKenzie
Dr. Sean MacKenzie
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Dr. Latisha Smith
Wound care
2 doctors agree
In brief: Bad artery blockage
The most common reason for limb amputation is peripheral artery disease (pad).
When an affected limb has so little circulation that it requires amputation the longer the time between having severe pain in the leg and amputation, the more likely phantom limb pain will develop. Amputations for infection or trauma have less incidence of phantom pain but it can happen.

In brief: Bad artery blockage
The most common reason for limb amputation is peripheral artery disease (pad).
When an affected limb has so little circulation that it requires amputation the longer the time between having severe pain in the leg and amputation, the more likely phantom limb pain will develop. Amputations for infection or trauma have less incidence of phantom pain but it can happen.
Dr. Latisha Smith
Dr. Latisha Smith
Thank
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