Is brca genetic testing a simple blood test?

Yes. BRCA testing can be performed from either blood or saliva. A significant amount of DNA needs to be present for adequate testing so most companies require more than a finger stick blood draw. Usually a single blood tube containing 3 ccs of blood is adequate.
Easy but expensive. Testing for mutations in the brca1 gene is relatively easy; yes, the dna can come from white blood cells from a blood sample. However as of now this remains a fairly expensive test; the new supreme court decision voiding the patent on the gene will probably lead to lower costs through competition but i don't think this has happened much yet.
Simple blood test. Women w/ 2+ immediate family members w/ a hx of breast/ovarian CA at 50% chance of developing breast cancer. If you have it, get screened with CA-125 blood test, ultrasound, mammogram/MRI, usually starting at age 30. Surgery after childbearing.

Related Questions

How is genetic testing for heart conditions done? Blood test?

Geenetic consult. It is known that the heritability of heart disease is 45-55%, but only 10% of possible genetic causes have been found. Genetic testing usually begins by meeting with a genetic counselor and/or medical geneticist physician, individualized risk assessment; blood work for genetic testing when indicated. Read more...
Yes. Most commonly a blood test is used, but many other tissues that contain dna can be analyzed. The labs that perform blood tests are much more common and accessible. Read more...

How many relatives need to have had breastcancer before you should get genetic testing for the BRCA genes? My mother contracted breast cancer, I am 40

Other factors must . be considered. If your mom had a harmful BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, breast cancer diagnosed before age 50, cancer in both breasts, both breast and ovarian cancers, multiple breast cancers or your ethnicity is Ashkenazi Jewish, talk to your GYN about genetic counseling to evaluate your potential risk. Read more...
Usually 2. With some exceptions, the number is two first-degree relatives (mom/sisters), before screening for BRCA. Exceptions include if there is a history of ovarian cancer, pre-menopausal breast cancer (age . Read more...
See genetics. Most breast cancer is NOT due to an inherited risk, but rather occurs by chance. Family history that suggests an inherited risk, such as changes in the BRCA1 gene or BRCA2 gene, include multiple relatives with cancer over more than one generation and younger ages of onset. If you are concerned about an inherited risk, see a geneticist who can assess your family history. Read more...