What are the tip-offs that you might have diabetic ulcers?

Diabetic Ulcers. Lack of feeling in your toes or feet. Not being aware of the cold. Being unsteady on your feet. Sores or open wounds on your feet. These typically start with areas of redness which are surrounded by thick callous formation. Podiatric management of the callous may help to minimize the exacerbation of the sores.
Broken skin. A ulcer is a while in the skin on the foot of a diabetic. See podiatrist for proper treatment and control sugar better with primary physician.
Diabetic ulcer. People with diabetes are prone to development of ulcers because they have altered sensation (so they don't feel an injury), they have disturbed blood supply (impaired oxygen delivery and reduced immune competency); and because their serum has a higher sugar level (glycemia), it is a better medium for bacterial growth. So, an open sore in a diabetic is a diabetic ulcer until proven otherwise.
Open sores. True diabetic ulcers occur on the shins, usually. Often, people refer to neuropathic ulcers as "diabetic ulcers." these occur on the weight-bearing areas of the feet in people with numb feet. They begin as blisters, become calluses and then progress to open sores. While diabetes is the most common cause of foot numbness in the us, it is not the only cause. Ulcers of any kind need prompt attention.
Skin color change. Diabetic ulcers often start out as calluses to the bottom of the foot under pressure points. The callus builds up enough to start to break down the underlying skin and soft tissue. This leads usually to bleeding under the skin which looks dark red or bluish. You need to see your podiatrist asap if there is any question as to whether you might have a diabetic ulcer.
Being diabetic. And having an open wound on the bottom f the foot or even callous tissue on the bottom of the foot as an ulcer may be hiding under one of them....One who has diabetes should invest in a mirror and check the bottom of their feet daily....
A wound. If you are a diabetic and have a wound on the end/bottoms of your toes or bottom of your feet then you have a diabetic ulcer. If this is true see a wound care specialist.
Your feet. Obviously if you are diabetic your are at risk. Do you have thick recurring calluses? Open sores on feet legs?Numbness or burning pain in feet and ankles? Slow healing of skin injuries of any kind? Are you known to have poor circulation in your feet/legs?

Related Questions

How can you avoid diabetic ulcers?

Good control. Good diabetes control proper firing shoes are important in mini zing ulcers. Diabetics should see podiatrist as part of their health care team and treat even minor foot problems before they get worse. Read more...
Prevention. Diabetic ulcers can occur when diabetics have neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy occurs when the diabetes is poorly controlled and results in a loss of protective sensations to the bottom of the foot. Along with skin changes, the pressure areas of the foot can develop a callus which eventually leads to an ulcer. Prevention is the key. Inspect your feet nightly. Wear proper fitting shoes. Read more...
Tight control. Tight control of your blood sugars and assuring excellent foot care are the best methods. Read more...
Prompt attention. True diabetic ulcers typically occur on the shin and need prompt attention. Neuropathic ulcers occur on the feet and are caused by uneven pressure on feet with less than normal feeling. They occur in anyone with numb feet. In the US, most, but not all, foot numbness is caused by diabetes, so neuropathic ulcers are often called diabetic ulcers. Footwear here is critical! Read more...
Glucose control. The best bet is to tightly control your diabetes. If overweight consult your doctor about a medically supervised weight loss plan. Wear good fitting shoes and check for any places that might be rubbing especially if you have abnormal sensation in your feet. Seek early care if you start to develope any type of sore. Read more...
Few ideas. Precaution: examine your feet daily, protect them by wearing shoes, take care of them i.E: moisturize to not allow them to dry. Keep strict glycemic control, if feel numbness in feet/toes try and treat immediately to prevent this from progressing. Read more...
Good care. Excellent diabetes control, maintain and correct vascular occlusions of needed, avoid tight shoes and get fitted for diabetic ones, avoid pressure points and check them daily. Avoid extreme dryness or wetness between toes. Podiatrist should do regular checks and correct any bad deformity. Read more...

What are the symptoms of diabetic ulcers?

Numbness, discharge. The typical ulcer caused by having diabetes is that due to the development of peripheral neuropathy. Once a daibetic has lost sensation in the feet, the muscles of the feet cause the toes to draw up into a 'claw' foot type shape. This causes excess pressures on the bottom of the foot and ulcers develop as a result of the pressure. Most patients discover an ulcer because of discharge in their sock. Read more...
Diabetic ulcers. This is great question in order to make the point that you just might have no symptoms. Diabetic patients may have neurological problems and have no feeling for an ulcer that would otherwise be painful. Other symptoms could be drainage pain color swelling and systemic signs of infection such as fever and chills. Read more...
A hole in your foot. An ulcer by definition is a hole or opening in your skin. A diabetic may or may not feel it. More commonly it is not felt due to damage of nerves known as neuropathy. If infection is present there may be malodor, drainage, redness or swelling. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Diabetic ulcers?

Wound. Wound on lower extremity in a patient with diabetes as the skin integrity is lacking May be associated with vascular disease If concerned about bacteria in wound usually there are more than one bacteria at play Often cuts as a result of the walking surface of the foot doesn't hit the ground straight. Read more...

Please let me know if there is a such thing as diabetic ulcers?

Absolutely. Diabetic ulcers are typically seen on the feet and not in the stomach if that's what you're thinking. Read more...
Yes. Usually, this is an ulcer on the foot a patient has that is diabetic. The patient is at a higher risk than a non diabetic due to impaired healing that may be caused by poor blood supply, or the inability to feel pain known as neuropathy. Read more...

Can you tell me if there are natural ways to heal diabetic ulcers?

Yes. The only natural method for healing diabetic ulcers that I am aware of is good blood sugar control. However, most people require diabetic medications in addition to dietary changes. Another key is prevention. Since the nerve endings become damaged, they lose sensation, a natural protective mechanism. Wear properly fitting shoes that avoid pressure spots. Always protect your feet. Read more...
Not really. . Diabetic foot ulcers are complicated. The mantra for healing ulcers is removal of all non viable tissue, (the natural way would be maggot therapy) taking the pressure off the area, and keeping the area moist. New dressings used to help control infection have honey in it, but i wouldn't recommend smearing honey onto the ulcer. Controlling the sugars is imperative. I recommend seeing a professional. Read more...
Diabetic Foot Treat. Do not try to treat a diabetic foot infection with home remedies without at least having a professional observing as the consequences of an unsuccessful treatment can mean hospitalization, amputation or overwhelming sepsis and death. There are over 4000+ wound care products that are available so even among professionals, opinions vary. Attention to underlying causes of the ulceration are paramount. Read more...
Wound care. . Diabetic ulcers will generally heal if you offload the area (decrease direct pressure with an insert, or a wheelchair), have your doctor trim the callus and dead tissue away on a regular basis, and if the ulcer is infected, you may need oral or IV antibiotics, depending on the severity of the infection. Read more...
Natural diabetic ulc. Most of the time, diabetic ulcers are caused by pressure and sent some diabetics do not feel pain they continue to walk on areas of pressure. Simply offloading pressure from this area may help the ulcer heal very fast. There are some natural types of gels and honey products that are used however they are not natural as natural products themselves are not considered sterile. Read more...

What are some common consequences of having diabetic ulcers that would require hospitalization?

Infection,osteomyeli. Infection and cellulitis of the ulcer and osteomyelitis can require hospitalization for further treatment. Read more...
Infection. As long as you can keep the ulcer clean and non-infected home treatment with some assistance seems appropriate. If there is any unusual odor or discolored drainage on the bandage you need professional assistance for a possible infection. Read more...
The need for. Intravenous antibiotics, the need for a surgical procedure like drainage of an infection, the need for better monitoring of the patient i.E to control diabetes and care for the wound etc.... Read more...
Infection. Most commonly would be an infection requiring IV antibiotics. Also may require surgical drainage or debridement of infection. If ulcer is due to poor circulation, you may need surgery to improve the blood flow. If not taken care of in a timely fashion, an infected ulcer can cause bacteria to get into your bloodstream causing you to feel sick (sepsis). Blood glucose may be abnormally elevated. Read more...

Are there any sites with pictures for diabetic ulcers?

Yes many. Here is a good place to start: http://emedicine.Medscape.Com/article/460282-overview. Read more...
Google. Google "diabetic ulcers" and click the images tab but beware i saw examples of ulcers that were other types of ulcers. Read more...

What generally prevents diabetic ulcers from healing?

Circulation. Patients with diabetes develop numbness (neuropathy) in their feet which puts them at risk for getting wounds. Diabetes causes blockages in the small vessels of the feet causing poor circulation. In addition, diabetes affects the immune system and makes it less effective. Put together, diabetic patients are more likely to develop wounds and have a tougher time healing them. Read more...
Multiple issues. Healing of any wound requires good circulation, healthy tissues and proper nutrition. In diabetics we also think about neuropathy and pressure relief in addition to management of the blood sugars. Even if all but one of these issues is absolutely perfect the wound may still not heal. Please see a vascular surgeon or wound specialist for further evaluation. Read more...
Multiple factors. Multiple causes. Improper removal of all non viable tissue, inability to offload pressure from the area or excessive walking or standing. Infection and poor circulation can prevent healing. Poor sugar control. Poor nutrition, low blood proteins. Kidney status specifically dialysis. The list keeps going. Read more...
Many puzzle pieces. Offloading of diabetic foot ulcers, adequate circulation, good nutrition, blood sugar control, regular wound debridement by your physician, and local wound care are essential factors for wound healing. If any of these pieces of the puzzle are missing the final outcome may not be a pretty picture. Read more...
Many factors. The most common reason ulcers may have trouble healing: due to uncontrolled blood glucose levels, underlying infection, poor circulation, poor nutrition, too much pressure to the area, inappropriate wound care. Read more...