What does spinal stenosis affect?

Leads to pressure. On the the spinal cord (for cervical or thoracic spinal stenosis), and lead to pressure on nerves (in lumbar spinal stenosis). With decrease space where the nerves and spinal cord lives, they can start getting pressure, which leads to some variety of symptoms, depending on if the stenosis is localized in the cervical or lumbar spine, and how significant the stenosis is. See your spinal specialist.
Depends. Spinal stenosis in the neck can make someone weak and spastic (clumsy). Spinal stenosis of the low back can be painful, usually because of the facet arthritis involved with the process, it also causes weakness and forward leaning posture with high risk of fall. As it progresses, difficulties in emptying the badder, or incontinence. A person with stenosis should avoid walking down stairs.
Nerves. Spinal stenosis refers to a narrowing or "pinching" of the nerves in the nerve canal and as such can cause a wide variety if symptoms that are nerve related: pain, burning, numbness, weakness, in coordination to name a few.
Spinal stenosis. Spinal stenosis in a condition wherein tissue grows around the spinal cord, causing gradual compression and pain. It's progressive and unrelenting. Unfortunately leading to debility and pain. Surgical options are available which may help, but left alone it'll cause progressive limitations. The rate of progression is unpredictable.

Related Questions

Could spinal stenosis get so bad you can't bend without extreme pain?

No. Spinal stenosis actully improve with bending forward if the pain is on bending is suggests other etiologies for your pain possibly muscular. Read more...
Not forward but . Not bending forward which would open the spinal canal giving some relief but bending backwards would further narrow the canal causing greater neural compression and more pain in severe cases. Read more...

What is spinal stenosis?

Spinal narrowing. Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal (which contains the spinal cord and nerves) caused by enlargement of the surrounding ligaments and bones. This enlargement creates pressure on the nerves and/or spinal cord and their blood supply resulting usually in back and/or leg pain, especially when the patient is walking upright. The condition usually occurs in older people. Read more...
Narrowing... It's a narrowing of the central canal that your spinal cord travels through. Read more...
Too small a canal. Spinal stenosis is a spinal canal too small for its nerve tissue contents. This can be on a congenital basis or an acquired basis due to age related degenerative changes or even result from disc issues or from spinal deformities or instabilities or even from spinal fractures or possibly from prior spine surgery. This last reason is not fully conclusive. Read more...
Spinal stenosis. Spinal stenosis in a condition wherein tissue grows around the spinal cord, causing gradual compression and pain. It's progressive and unrelenting. Unfortunately leading to debility and pain. Surgical options are available which may help, but left alone it'll cause progressive limitations. The rate of progression is unpredictable. Read more...

Who treats spinal stenosis?

Spine surgeon. Whether or not you need surgery, an experienced neurosurgeon or orthopedic spine surgeon is the best resource to educate you in the treatment options available. Read more...
Pain physicians also. In addition to dr. Frankel's answer, also consider talking to an interventional pain/spine physician. They have other minimally invasive options to treat spinal stenosis, such as the mild procedure. Read more...
PT,PainMD,SpineSurge. Treatment of Spinal Stenosis consists of Physical Therapy,Pain Management and Spine Surgery.Depending on the severity of the condition 1Physical Therapist 2Pain Management includes Pain Meds and Epidural Injections 3Spine Surgeone in those severe cases not respnding to PT and Pain Management. Read more...
Primary care. Initially, usually primary care and chiropractors. If it worsens, then orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, and interventional pain doctors can get involved. Read more...

What causes spinal stenosis?

Several things. Spinal stenosis can be congenital but is also acquired with aging, or trauma, by either arthritis, herniated discs or even vertebral collapse as people age, which can result in vertebra slipping across each other which can cause stenosis too. It is important to see a neurosurgeon for evaluation, or a orthopedist who specializes in the spine, for full evaluation and treatment, surgery is an option. Read more...
Several causes. People are born with either a small, medium or large spinal canal. Spinal stenosis is when the canal is too narrow fornerve tissue resultting in its compression. Everyone's canal narrows with time due to degeneration. By age 60, 20% have imaging finding of stenosis but not necessarily symptoms. Other causes are: congenital v acquired due to - fracture, herniation, tumor, fat, instability. Read more...

What causes spinal stenosis?

You can't. The size of the canal is inherited. The secondary degenerative leading to further narrowing is also linked to genetics. You may be able to reduce this by healthy living (regular exercise, no tobacco use, etc), but overall you have little influence on this condition. Read more...
Born with or develop. Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal leading to compression of nerve tissue. You can be born with it or you can develop it with age related or degenerative changes or acquire it through deformities/instabilities or with disc herniations, synovial cysts or after some spine fractures. Read more...
Spinal stenosis. Spinal stenosis in a condition wherein tissue grows around the spinal cord, causing gradual compression and pain. It's progressive and unrelenting. Unfortunately leading to debility and pain. Surgical options are available which may help, but left alone it'll cause progressive limitations. The rate of progression is unpredictable. Read more...
Degeneration. The most common type is caused by a gradual, progressive arthritic process in the spine. Read more...

Is spinal stenosis inherited?

Not really. Spinal stenosis can be caused by many things. But as long as the canal is narrowed, by a variety of things, we call it stenosis. Congenital stenosis means you were born with a narrow canal. Other common causes of stenosis would be arthritis that causes bone and tissue to occupy the canal and make it narrow. Other less common forms of stenosis would tumor and infection. Read more...
Maybe. There is a type of spinal stenosis that is known as congenital which means you are born with it but it is not inherited but there are syndromes that have a genetic or inherited basis that have as a feature spinal stenosis. Most stenosis issues develop over time. Read more...
Varies . The most common type of spinal stenosis is known as degenerative spinal stenosis and it is more not felt to be inherited. There is a type of spinal stenosis known as congenital spinal stenosis, and this type could very well have a genetic component to it. Read more...

What is spinal stenosis like?

It can be very. Painful. It is a decrease in space in the spinal canal which then impends on your spinal cord and/or nerve roots. It can be painful, which may decrease when bending forward as this frees up space in the canal. It can send shooting pains down limbs and can be a very aggravating and painful process. Therapy, injections and medications can help. Read more...
Spinal stenosis. Spinal stenosis in a condition wherein tissue grows around the spinal cord, causing gradual compression and pain. It's progressive and unrelenting. Unfortunately leading to debility and pain. Surgical options are available which may help, but left alone it'll cause progressive limitations. The rate of progression is unpredictable. Read more...
Can be Painful. Spinal Stenosis is actually narrowing of the spinal canal space due to Osteoarthritis,Aging,Instability of spine(slipped Disc)Hereditary in young people,Trauma and Tumors of spine Because of the narrowing there is often pressure on the nerves&it causes severe pain radiating down lower extremities It is Diagnosed after History,Physical Exam and MRI of the spine Treated with PT,EpiduraI Inj&Surgery. Read more...
Narrowing. Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the nerve canal, it can affect any part of the spine. Patients with spinal stenosis in the low back may start to lean forward when they walk, you will sometimes see them at the store leaning on to a grocery cart. There are good treatment options available. Read more...

What can help spinal stenosis?

Spinal stenosis. Many possibilities. Proper help depends on accurate and thorough diagnosis. Spinal stenosis can occur at many different levels of the spine and can occur from one or more factors causing the sternosis. Best is to obtain examination and proper treatment from spinal specialists e.g. Neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons, physical therapy and pain doctors who specialize in this disorder. Read more...
Other options. In addition to dr. Pizzo's answer above, the treatment options typically include: conservative therapy (medication, pt), epidural steroid injections, the mild procedure, and traditional open surgery. Which one is best depends on your examination, symptoms, and usually the results of an MRI scan of the spine. Read more...
Depends. Surgery is typically a definitive treatment for the symptomatology, although, non-surgical management should be initiated first. Surgical Treatment for spinal stenosis usually consists of decompressive laminectomy (unroofing of the spinal canal) with or without fusion. Read more...
Options. Spinal stenosis can be treated conservatively with physical therapy and lumbar epidural steroid injections. Your spine specialist can thoroughly evaluate you and help coordinate conservative care if appropriate. Surgery is usually helpful if all else fails. Check out spine-health.Com. Read more...
Multiple. There are multiple treatments available for spinal stenosis to varying degrees of success. The most common nonoperative treatment for spinal stenosis is typically an epidural steroid injection. Read more...

Does lsi treat spinal stenosis?

Not really. I assume by lsi, you are referring to lumbar spinal injections, also known as epidural steroid injections (esis). These can help temporarily treat some of the pain associated with spinal stenosis but are not a definitive treatment. Check out http://www.Mildprocedure.Com for some information on a new minimally invasive procedure for spinal stenosis. Read more...
If you mean epidural. If you mean epidural spinal injections, these can work for about 50% of people long term & can be repeated as needed as long as they give good relief for many months or a year or more. Mention of a mild procedure was noted which probably is less effective than injections but there is little data supporting the latter procedure to even evaluate it & it is not marketed to spine surgeons as a rule. Read more...
Common option. LESIs are commonly used for conservative treatment of symptomatic spinal stenosis. Check out Spine-health.com. Read more...