10 doctors weighed in:

What are the consequences of having posterior vitreous detachment?

10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology
4 doctors agree

In brief: Floaters

The vitreous detaches from the back of the eye as a normal aging process.
Usually without symptoms, but sometimes you may experience new floaters, some light flashes and a cellophaney view from the eye. Most are benign, although floaters can be annoying, but the symptoms are similar to those of retinal detachment so it is best to have an ophthalmologist assess this.

In brief: Floaters

The vitreous detaches from the back of the eye as a normal aging process.
Usually without symptoms, but sometimes you may experience new floaters, some light flashes and a cellophaney view from the eye. Most are benign, although floaters can be annoying, but the symptoms are similar to those of retinal detachment so it is best to have an ophthalmologist assess this.
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Dr. Richard Bensinger
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Dr. Ilan Cohen
Ophthalmology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Floaters

Typically the only consequence of having a posterior vitreal detachment (PVD) is the perception of floating objects in your vision.
Rarely, the PVD can be associated with tears in the peripheral retina and holes/swelling of the central retina. Follow up as directed by your eye doctor after the diagnosis of PVD in order to check for these complications.

In brief: Floaters

Typically the only consequence of having a posterior vitreal detachment (PVD) is the perception of floating objects in your vision.
Rarely, the PVD can be associated with tears in the peripheral retina and holes/swelling of the central retina. Follow up as directed by your eye doctor after the diagnosis of PVD in order to check for these complications.
Dr. Ilan Cohen
Dr. Ilan Cohen
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Dr. Majid Moshirfar
Ophthalmology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Usually not serious

Posterior vitreous detachment or PVD is a quite common phenomenon in patients after certain age.
Floaters and flashes can be a secondary consequence as a result of pvd. Patients with acute PVD should consult an ophthalmologist for dilated eye exam to rule out concomitant retinal detachment which can be quite serious. If you notice persistent flashes of lights with increased floaters, please call.

In brief: Usually not serious

Posterior vitreous detachment or PVD is a quite common phenomenon in patients after certain age.
Floaters and flashes can be a secondary consequence as a result of pvd. Patients with acute PVD should consult an ophthalmologist for dilated eye exam to rule out concomitant retinal detachment which can be quite serious. If you notice persistent flashes of lights with increased floaters, please call.
Dr. Majid Moshirfar
Dr. Majid Moshirfar
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