Treatment options for intermittent claudication? Thanks!

Many. Intermittent claudication is due to deficient circulation in the legs and hurts because the muscles are starving for oxygen. If you smoke, quitting can immediately provide relief. A drug called Pletal (cilostazol) is helpful for some. Restoring circulation by either using a balloon and stent or operation is the last option but often highly beneficial.
Walk! If symptoms are severe or you are in danger of amputation, re-vascularization by surgery or angioplasty is needed. For most, you need to reduce your risk factors: stop smoking, lower cholesterol and treat high blood pressure. Medications specific to claudication are not very useful. Most useful is to maintain a walking program, which helps form new blood vessels.

Related Questions

Is IV chelation therapy effective for intermittent claudication?

Yes. Probably the best-studied use of edta chelation therapy has been for intermittent claudication (peripheral vascular disease). Contact the american college for advancement in medicine (www.Acam.Org) for clinical studies and names of physicians in your area who provide this treatment. Chelation therapy improves blood flow throughout the body, and benefits a wide range of ischemic conditions. Read more...

How to cure intermittent claudication and get active again?

Depends. It depends on where the blockages are and how severe. Sometimes medical therapy and a walking program are effective. Smoking cessation is an absolute requirement. Angioplasty/stenting may be indicated and even surgery. See your doctor asap. Claudication is often a marker of coronary artery disease as well. Read more...
Depends.... There are basically 2 types of claudication: one from compression of your spinal cord and the other from lack of blood flow. The former generally causes pain in the legs when standing and doesn't go away with rest. It requires a physician evaluation. The latter is best treated with exercise. Of concern is the existence of heart disease and risk of stroke in this case - see your doctor! Read more...