My brother has myelodysplastic syndromes. Should I be worried about this?

Possibly. This would depend upon your brothers age, and his risk factors. For instance if he is elderly, and has significant chemical exposure, than no. If he is young, under the age of 50, mds is uncommon and i would seek a second opinion to confirm the diagnosis. If it turns out to actually be mds than yes, you would be at a higher risk.
Probably not. Myelodysplastic syndrome (mds) in a first degree relative may slightly increase your overall risk but this is still minimal.
Subtypes. There are subtypes. Certain types are more aggressive. There are certain genetic markers which can give you a guide to the prognosis.

Related Questions

Myelodysplastic syndromes are what?

Blood disease. These are a group of blood disorders that cause anemia or problems with the white cells, platelets or all three. There are several different forms that have varied prognosis. Some are very close to leukemia. These are diagnosed on bone marrow testing. There are some damaged chromosomes that can be found with this group of diseases. Some are very treatable, and some not so. Read more...
See below... Myelodysplastic syndrome (mds) is a form of bone marrow cancer that is generally less aggressive than leukemia but nevertheless still malignant. Mds usually evolves more slowly then leukemia and sometimes can transform into acute leukemia and become more aggressive and faster evolving. Read more...

What are the tests for myelodysplastic syndromes?

CBC and bone marrow . Mds is diagnosed with a bone marrow biopsy. The biopsy is examined under the microscope and the chromosomes are analyzed for certain changes. A complete blood count can be used to follow the disease and response to therapy. Read more...
Bone marrow. The only way to diagnose a myelodysplastic syndrome completely and accurately including prognostic factors is by performing a bone marrow biopsy and aspiration with subsequent multi-pronged assessment: morphology, flow cytometry, cytogenetics, and molecular studies. Some changes in the peripheral blood may suggest mds but a complete diagnosis still relies on bone marrow examination. Read more...

Are some people more prone to getting myelodysplastic syndromes?

Yes. There are some risk factors for myelodysplastic syndrome(mds). People exposed to certain chemotherapy drugs are at increased risk due to damage to the bone marrow dna from some chemo drugs. There is a higher risk of mds as people age. Certain genetic disorders (such as down syndrome) put people at risk for mds. Tobacco use is also associated with an increased risk of mds. Read more...
See below... The elderly are usually more prone to develop a myelodysplastic syndrome (mds). Also, genetic factors play an important role. Exposure to certain chemicals, toxins, and radiation also increases the chance of developing mds. Read more...

What are the symptoms of myelodysplastic syndromes (mds)?

It varies. There may be none or the patient may feel tired from anemia, show signs of bruising from low platelets or infections from low white blood counts. Read more...
Variable. The disease may be asymptomatic and can be diagnosed because of abnormal blood tests. Or there can be symptoms such as fatigue, shortness of breath, bleeding, easy bruising and increased infections. Read more...
Bone marrow. The only way to diagnose a myelodysplastic syndrome completely an accurately including prognostic factors is by performing a bone marrow biopsy and aspiration with subsequent multi-pronged assessment: morphology, flow cytometry, cytogenetics, and molecular studies. Some changes in the peripheral blood may suggest mds but a complete diagnosis still relies on bone marrow examination. Read more...
MDS. is sometimes called Refractory Anemia because it causes anemia (low red blood cells) that doesn't get better with iron and vitamin replacement. Anemia makes the skin look pale and causes shortness of breath with exercise, because RBC carry oxygen. MDS may also cause low white blood cells (WBC) which increases the risk infections; and low low blood platelets which causes easy bruising or bleeding. Read more...

Are there treatment guidelines for myelodysplastic syndromes?

Yes. Nccn, a nationaly recognized organization publishes guidlines for the treatments of all malignancies including mds. Read more...
Yes. The national comprehensive cancer network publishes guidelines for the treament of myelodysplastic syndromes. Read more...
See below... Myelodysplastic syndromes (mds) represent a group of bone marrow cancers similar to leukemias in many respects but usually with a less aggressive evolution. Like many other types of cancer, treatment includes chemotherapy and sometimes bone marrow transplantation; however, if the mds is low grade sometimes treatment is not necessary, at least not initially (watchful waiting). Read more...

What is myelodysplastic syndromes (mds)?

Definition. The myelodysplastic syndromes (mds) comprise a heterogeneous group of malignant stem cell disorders characterized by dysplastic and ineffective blood cell production and a variable risk of transformation to acute leukemia. Read more...
Bone narrow disease. This is a group of disease that result in bone marrow failure. This can present as anemia or low blood counts. There are several forms of the disorder. Some have long histories and courses and some quickly turn to leukemia. A bone marrow and special test on it are needed to determine the type, treatment, and benefit of treatment. Read more...
See below... Myelodysplastic syndrome (mds) is a form of bone marrow cancer that is generally less aggressive than leukemia but nevertheless still malignant. Mds usually evolves more slowly then leukemia and sometimes can transform into acute leukemia and become more aggressive and faster evolving. Read more...
Bone marrow disease. MDS is a disease of bone marrow that causes blood precursor cells to have an abnormal appearance ("dysplasia"), and prevents normal production of mature RBC or WBC. This can cause seriously low blood cell counts. It arises from gene mutations acquired during your lifetime, in bone marrow cells. There is a risk that, with additional mutations, it can evolve into acute leukemia. Read more...

What are effective treatments for myelodysplastic syndromes (mds)?

It depends. Treatment of mds will vary according to the clinical situation and a variety of findings on bone marrow such as the percentage of blasts, cytogenetic abnormalities and need for transfusions. Read more...
Treatment options. As mentioned it depends on the clinical situation. Sometimes treatment is just with observation, transfusions when needed. Drugs called growth factors can be used in some situations. There are some chemotherapy drugs that are effective and for aggressive cases a stem cell transplant can be used. Read more...
See below... Myelodysplastic syndromes (mds) represent a group of bone marrow cancers similar to leukemias in many respects but usually with a less aggressive evolution. Like many other types of cancer, treatment includes chemotherapy and sometimes bone marrow transplantation; however, if the mds is low grade sometimes treatment is not necessary, at least not initially (watchful waiting). Read more...

Are there any herbal supplaments that may help my mom who has myelodysplastic syndromes?

Unfortunately not. I am sorry about your mom's condition. She needs to be seen by her doctor -re weakness. Weakness in mds can be caused by anemia ( low hemoglobin)- but one can also feel weak due to other reasons including- dehydration, low blood pressure, low blood sugar etc. If the weakness is caused by her anemia related to her mds- blood transfusion should be considered as well as growth support (esa). Read more...
MDS: B12, Folate, (folic acid) Fe. Supplements in MDS is complex and depends on patient blood levels. In general, B12, folate (folic acid), (folic acid) and iron levels should be checked. If B12 or folate (folic acid) levels are low, then these should be replaced because they can help with red blood cell production. Iron can be normal or high in MDS. I generally recommend avoiding iron because many MDS patients can become iron overloaded by blood transfusions. Read more...

Hello doctor my father was diagnosed with Myelodysplastic Syndromes can he be treated by bone marrow transplant?

Yes, but... To answer your question, yes, bone marrow transplant is a treatment option for MDS but is not usually the immediate choice. MDS is a very broad spectrum of diseases and each case is unique, thus there are many considerations before deciding on the best therapy approach. Sorry to hear about your father. Below is a link for more information about treatments for MDS. http://bit.ly/2iADlYQ. Read more...