Md wants to treat peripheral vascular disease. What if I don't?

Gets worse. Treat now or you will regret it later. Exercise, eat right, no smoking, BP control, diabetes control. Cholesterol control. See your doctor and develope a plan.
Ask your doctor. You should take steps to improve health including smoking cessation, healthy diet , exercise, keeping cholesterol and blood pressure lot with medications if necessary and perhaps taking aspirin. As to whether you should have a stent or surgery to improve circulation to your legs depends on your symptoms and whether you are at risk of loosing part of a limb from poor circulation.

Related Questions

Can there be any effectilve medicine to treat peripheral vascular disease?

Yes, blood. Thinners and anti-platelet classes of drugs. Your doctor will know which one to prescribe for which condition. Read more...
Medical treatment. If you mean treating the systemic effects of peripheral arterial disease (pad), such as atherosclerosis and particularly with coronary artery disease, there are a number of medications available. If you mean specifically for the symptoms of pad in the legs, most commonly intermittent claudication (ic), Cilostazol has been proven to be quite effective in reducing the severity of ic. Talk with pcp. Read more...

Is there any effectilve medicine to treat peripheral vascular disease: any hope?

Vascular Disease. Vascular disease is an intrinsic part of diabetes mellitus. Prolonged elevated blood sugars have a profound and lasting effect on the vascular and neurologic structures.. Exercise, diet changes and smoking cessation are very important ! Read more...
Yes. Although there are simple lifestyle modification that can help, i.e. not smoking, exercising regularly, eating low fat / low cholesterol diet, & maintaining normal weight, there are also medications that can benefit. Some include statin drugs (such as Lipitor, (atorvastatin) Zocor), claudication medication (such as Cilostazol), antiplatelet meds (ASA, Plavix). Control diabetes & hypertension. See vascular expert. Read more...

What are some exercises that I can do to treat peripheral vascular disease?

Walk. Supervised exercise programs have been shown to increase the distance people with peripheral vascular disease can walk. This doesn't necessarily heal the diseased arteries, but your body develops what we call a "collateral circulation" to help improve blood flow. Read more...
Cardio. If you can exercise at least three times a week where you are sweating and increase your heart rate, that should help decrease your risk. Read more...

Is there any effective medicine that treats peripheral vascular disease?

Tx. No smoking; meds to help stop smoking would be useful. Walking to tolerance is advised. This is not doubt the most important thing. Statins are advised as there is generally blocked arteries elsewhere. Aspirin is useful. Pletal (cilostazol) is a drug that some find lets them walk further. Read more...
Yes. There are several medications that are useful for pad. These include the statin medications (for cholesterol), which stabilize plaques, aspirin/plavix- platelet medications, and cilostazol- which improves the distance you are able to walk. None of these medications will eliminate vascular disease once it has developed, but they will all work in different ways to help control or improve symptoms. Read more...

Could a doctor here tell me what is a peripheral vascular disease?

Peripheral. Peripheral artery disease, or "pad" is a blood vessel condition that is usually the result of progressive plaque build-up within the walls of arteries than leads to blockage of blood flow. It can cause leg pain when walking, usually in the calves, pain at rest in the foot or leg, leg numbness or tingling, coldness or discoloration of the skin, foot or leg ulcers, gangrene, poor healing of wounds. . Read more...

I have the same problem as question 391172. My doctor says it's not peripheral vascular disease. Circulation is fine. Any ideas please? Can't sleep.

Sorry I am not. sure what question 391172 is. But if you do not have PAD neuropathy may be a consideration. For sleep will advise sleep hygiene, going to bed after physical exhaustion, avoiding environmental stimulation, exercise, regular sleeping hours and avoiding day time naps. Read more...
2 Issues 1st: Artery. Ds present in ~1/2 of humans by late childhood, asymptomatic for decades & missed by medical exams because in wall, arteries enlarge, does not narrow artery lumen/impede blood flow until advanced/late due to plaque ruptures & clots. 2nd: Local blood flow controlled by arterioles, not the larger/visible supply arteries (lumens visible by angiograms); local flow can be ?ed though major supply open. Read more...