7 doctors weighed in:
If I develop plantar fasciitis, how will it be treated?
7 doctors weighed in

Dr. Libby Putnam
Podiatry
2 doctors agree
In brief: Combo treatment.
If you have plantar fasciitis, and hurt most with the first few steps in the morning, the more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes.
#2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area.

In brief: Combo treatment.
If you have plantar fasciitis, and hurt most with the first few steps in the morning, the more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes.
#2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area.
Dr. Libby Putnam
Dr. Libby Putnam
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Dr. Mathew John
Podiatry
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Multiple treatments
Plantar fascitis is complex condition that can be treated with simple stretching but in severe cases may require surgery.
Typical treatments include: home stretching, nightsplints, orthotics, cortisone injections, physical therapy, shockwave treatment (eswt), and on rare cases plantar fasciotomy (partial release of the plantar fascia ligament).

In brief: Multiple treatments
Plantar fascitis is complex condition that can be treated with simple stretching but in severe cases may require surgery.
Typical treatments include: home stretching, nightsplints, orthotics, cortisone injections, physical therapy, shockwave treatment (eswt), and on rare cases plantar fasciotomy (partial release of the plantar fascia ligament).
Dr. Mathew John
Dr. Mathew John
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Dr. Jeffrey Sider
Sports Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Stretching
Usually it will be treated with stretching exercises and nsaids depending on your response, you might require a local cortisone injection, physical therapy or shoe inserts.

In brief: Stretching
Usually it will be treated with stretching exercises and nsaids depending on your response, you might require a local cortisone injection, physical therapy or shoe inserts.
Dr. Jeffrey Sider
Dr. Jeffrey Sider
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In brief: Protocol...
I'd say 98% of my plantar fascitis patients respond to non-surgical treatments.
.. Rest, supportive insoles, rx orthotics, otc anti-inflammatories (like aleve), prescription nsaid's, steroid injections, prp injections, physical therapy, etc... If all else fails... Surgery.

In brief: Protocol...
I'd say 98% of my plantar fascitis patients respond to non-surgical treatments.
.. Rest, supportive insoles, rx orthotics, otc anti-inflammatories (like aleve), prescription nsaid's, steroid injections, prp injections, physical therapy, etc... If all else fails... Surgery.
Dr. David Hettinger
Dr. David Hettinger
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