Are there effective alternative therapies for renal artery occlusion?

NO. I am not aware of any alternative therapies.
No. No more than for a broken collarbone. It's a mechanical problem requiring a mechanical fix. If you have the opportunity to have a narrowed renal artery repaired mechanically, it is a life-saver -- both short-term and long-term. If you neglect effective treatment, you'll be sorry. Save the "alternative medicine" for things that evidence-based medicine can't fix.

Related Questions

What are some alternative treatments for renal artery occlusion?

Medications. Occlusion means 100% stenosis. Usually not worth trying to opening due to high failure rate and due to the residual alive part of the kidney already is getting blood from somewhere and whatever died of it has died also risk benefit from bypass surgery is not favorable for same reason. Medications for BP control and conservative management is the way to proceed usually.Also protect the other kidney. Read more...
Angioplasty/medicine. Rao usually discovered during hypertension work-up, or when dr. Hears an abdominal bruit (sound with stethoscope) over renal artery.Bp must be controlled asap with antihypertensive medication and low sodium diet.Then option for angioplasty, best performed by experienced interventional radiologist. Results of medication alone or + angioplasty similar. Some 1 in 5-10 get off meds after angioplasty. Read more...

Are there any helpful tips for the recuperation period after renal artery occlusion?

Diagnose etiology. Most important aspect of the management of renal artery occlusion is to diagnose the etiology. If you were already evaluated by your physician the only thing that can be done is hydration and pain control. Read more...

How do you typically diagnose renal artery occlusion?

See below. The gold standard for detecting renal artery occlusion is a renal angiogram, which is injecting a iodinated dye into the blood vessel and taking images. The dye itself can cause some reversible renal injury, and should be used weighing the risk and benefit. Other rare but serious complication is cholesterol embolii syndrome. Other tests eg ultrasound and MRI may not be conclusive. Read more...
Renal artery bruit. This is a sound heard by stethoscope in abdomen. Magnetic resonance angiogram (mra) is a non-invasive radiologic study which can demonstrate the occlusion. Sometimes diagnosed by ct scan with intravenous contrast. Finally diagnosed or confirmed by renal arterial angiogram performed by interventional radiologist prior to angioplasty. Read more...

What are the common symptoms of a renal artery occlusion?

No common symptoms. This problem is most commonly found, without symptoms, during testing for high blood pressure. The common causes are chronic occlusion from atherosclerosis or hyperplasia of the artery. Acute embolic occlusion may result in severe flank pain. This is uncommon. Read more...

How common is it for somebody to get renal artery occlusion?

Not so common. Depends on your age, BP level- less than 1% of patients with moderate or gr 2 ( BP more than 160/100) high blood pressure will have renal artery stenosis or blockage. More common in caucasians than african americans.Usually don't have to screen for ras unless patient is on multiple medications , unable to tolerate medicines, severe high BP requiring hospitalization or kidney function is affected. Read more...
Depends on age, etc. Renal artery stenosis (ras) typically occurs when there is generalized vascular disease from "hardening of the arteries" or less commonly in fibromuscular dysplasia. It's usually associated with BP that's accelerated or difficult to control, and may lead to decline in kidney function or sudden pulmonary edema. Definitive diagnosis is with arteriography & some cases can be treated or reversed. Read more...

Are some people more prone to getting renal artery occlusion?

Yes. The most common cause of renal artery stenosis is an obstructing plaque which is due to atherosclerosis. A history of smoking, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes can cause a blockage to form in these arteries. Another rarer cause is blockage due to thickening within the arterial wall due to inflammation. This tends to occur in women, usually 30-50s, with little or no other risks. Read more...
Atherosclerosis can. Affect any artery & thus subjects with this condition are at risk for renal artery occlusion, as are people with neurofiromatosis. Some young women develop fibromuscular dysplasia which causes renal artery occlusion. Read more...

How do you effectively prevent renal artery occlusion?

Placing a stent. Renal artery stents can dilate a stenosed or narror renal artery and prevent occlusion. Read more...
Best. To prevent stenosis in first place. Eat correctly, exercise, control blood sugar, no smoking. See heart.Org and stroke.Org to see best ways to take care of your blood vessels. What holds true for your heart and brain also applies to other blood vessels. Read more...

Are there some genetic reasons I could get renal artery occlusion?

Yes. There are inherited disorders of clotting that can predispose you to arterial disease in the kidney and elsewhere. Additionally there are familial disorders of metabolism that cause accelerated atherosclerosis. A strong family history of premature arterial disease or heart attacks raises one's suspicions. These conditions can be mitigated through judicious use of medications. Read more...
With neurofibromatos. Or with genetic predispositon for atherosclerosis due to inherited hypercholesterolemia. Otherwise not as a genetic reason by itself.. Read more...

What is the actual prognosis for renal artery occlusion?

Usually stable. Usually it is a slow process allowing the development of collateral circulation i.e. Side branches that bypass the occlusion. The kidney is already shrunken with poor function in most of the cases. But with stable function. Occlusion usually is not openable. Accordingly, deterioration of already poor kidney function is not aggrassive. Check with your doc about the other kidney condition. However! Read more...
Atrophy. If the vessel is truly totally occluded the kidney will shrink or atrophy. As long as the other kidney is ok, you should be too. See a good nephrologist and endovascular suegeon. Read more...