How many clamps are used for a tubal ligation?

Varies. There are different ways of doing it. Sometimes no clamps are used - sometimes clips, burning, cutting or tying the tubes is preformed. You would need to speak to your doctor to know.

Related Questions

Could one be allergic to the clamps used for tubal ligation? If so what would the symptoms be?

Surgical Problems. Nope. It would be highly unlikely to be allergic to the metal in clamps used during surgery. It is always better here to not pre-judge you diagnosis and to provide us with what your symptoms are specifically. Read more...
Possibly. Of course one can be allergic to anything. The clip itself is titanium, which is very non-allergenic with a silicone lining. The symptoms would be scar formation which could feel like pain in the pelvis. A laparoscopy could definitely confirm if an allergic reaction had occurred. Read more...

I got a tubal ligation 2 years ago and but now I want another child. They were cut and clamped not burned!?

Anastomosis. Micro tubal anastomosis is very successful when performed by well trained reproductive endocrinologists. The success rates depend upon where the ligation is on the tubes and what length of tube is left after the anastomosis procedure. Read more...
Surgery or IVF ... Your choices are a surgical tubal reversal or in vitro fertilization. Surgery may have high tubal patency rates (at least one tube stays open 70% of the time) but a higher chance of ectopic (tubal) pregnancy. Ivf may get you pregnant faster. Decision is affected by your age, your partner's sperm (get a semen analysis for him, whether a new partner or father of your child/ren). See md who does both. Read more...
IVF vs. BTA. Unless your tubal ligation ('tying') was unsuccesful/failed you cannot get pregnant without help. You may still have an excellent chance of pregnancy with ivf, and/or you might be a good candidate for tubal anastomosis ('tubal reversal.') a reproductive endocrinologist can help you learn more about these options. Read more...