What are the consequences of my kid having CMV infections?

Probably none. 50-80% of the population has been infected with cmv, mostly during childhood. A few people develop a mono like illness, e.g., fever, sore throat; but most are asymptomatic. Unless your kid has immune deficiency or an inter-current serious illness there is no reason to worry. If an adult develops immune deficiency the long ago infection can become active and serious.
Depends. If they get it from mom (first time infection) during pregnancy they can have brain damage or become deaf. Most have it in childhood where it is often similar to any other "virus" they have and get over.

Related Questions

What happens to my child as a result of CMV infection?

It depends. According to the match of dimes "cmv is the most common congenital (present at birth) infection in the United States. Each year, about 40, 000 babies are born with CMV infection. Luckily, the virus does not harm most of them. But about 4, 000 of these babies develop mental retardation, learning disabilities, hearing loss, vision loss, or other disabilities as a result of CMV infection. ". Read more...
Most likely nothing. More than half the children get CMV infection without any consequences. A few may get a mono like illness. Cmv is a serious illness for the fetus, if a mother gets primary infection during pregnancy. CMV infection, new or old, can be troublesome in people with immune deficiency. Read more...

How do pediatricians treat their own kids with CMV infections?

Should not. There is a general philosophy that doctors should not be treating members of their own family. If you are asking what the best therapy for CMV infection is, that is a different answer. Read more...

How should I treat CMV infection?

More info needed. Severity depends on the site. Most kids and adults recover without treatment if immune system is normal. Very complicated topic if there are immunologic issues. The virus is widespread among humans. Read more...
You do not. Vast majority of the CMV infections are sub-clinical, i.e., without signs or symptoms. Why do you want to treat CMV infection? If CMV infection needs treatment, the patient has other serious health issues and it is not something you would treat yourself for. Read more...

What are the tests for CMV infection?

Blood and urine. Blood for CMV antibodies: IgM and igg and urine culture. Often a metabolic profile is done to look at the liver functions and a blood count to look at the white cell response. Read more...

What are the tests for CMV infections?

Viral cultures, etc. The diagnosis is mostly done by tissue and peripheral blood leukosytes. These can take weeks. Other tests, like urine and saliva are not reliable, and ab titers can take 4 weeks. Read more...
CMV PCR. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test is considered the gold standard. Viral cultures take too long for results to come back and are rarely used. Read more...

What are the symptoms of CMV infection?

Varied. CMV can present like a common cold or like mono with fatigue, enlarged lymph nodes, even abnormal liver functions. In newborns it can be very problematic with many symptoms or it can be totally asymptomatic. Read more...

What's your opinion on treating CMV infections?

Usually none needed. Vast majority of CMV infections are subclinical and need no treatment. When CMV infections may require treatment, it is the associated disease process allowing CMV to be pathogenic that need to be addressed first. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: CMV infection?

CMV infection. CMV= cytomegalovirus, a virus in the herpesvirus family that can infect anyone. CMV is spread by direct contact of body fluids, such as saliva, blood, urine, semen, vaginal fluids, and breast milk. CMV infection can have a wide range of symptoms from no symptoms to symptoms of fever and fatigue (resembling infectious mononucleosis) to severe symptoms involving brain, eyes and other organs. Read more...

What are the tests for prenatal CMV infection?

Viral cultures, etc. This form of infection is usually asymptomatic and is acquired at birth by passage through the birth canal or after birth by maternal milk. CMV can cause protracted interstitial pneumonia in premature infants. The diagnosis is mostly done by tissue and peripheral blood leukosytes. These can take weeks. Other tests, like urine and saliva are not reliable, and ab titers can take 4 weeks. Read more...