4 doctors weighed in:

Why do steroids work in autoimmune diseases?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. John Chiu
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Antiinflammatory

Steroid mainly suppresses the inflammation induced by autoimmune disease.
There is a recent report suggesting that steroid may enhance immune regulation as well.

In brief: Antiinflammatory

Steroid mainly suppresses the inflammation induced by autoimmune disease.
There is a recent report suggesting that steroid may enhance immune regulation as well.
Dr. John Chiu
Dr. John Chiu
Thank
Dr. Donald Alves
Emergency Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: They attenuate

Or shut down the immune system's response to stimuli--even if that stimulus is yourself (in autoimmune conditions).

In brief: They attenuate

Or shut down the immune system's response to stimuli--even if that stimulus is yourself (in autoimmune conditions).
Dr. Donald Alves
Dr. Donald Alves
Thank
1 comment
Dr. John Chiu
Steroid mostly suppresses the inflammatory reactions caused by the abnormal immune reactions. With a huge dose (60 to 80 mg of prednisone a day) for months, some immune suppression can be achieved. Recently there was a report finding that steroid increased the number of lymphocytes (Treg) which regulated the immune function but this study has not been confirmed but did provide another potential benefit from cortisone (note that it also has a lot of bad side effects when taken in high dose for a long period)
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